Author Archive

Apr
09

Hog Hunting Rotation (Self-guided)

Posted by: | Comments (0)

The following is a rotation list for self-guided hog hunts at the Opiela ranchette near Austin.

Here are a few pictures from our most successful hunts:

Costs:

  • Shared lodging (not applicable if we’re camping or if the ranch is close to where we live).
  • For out-of-area hunts, we’ll carpool and split the vehicle gas (the amount depends on the distance traveled and the number of people sharing the gas).  If we take a toll road we’ll split that fee.
  • We’ll stop for drive-through food on the way to the hunt and will stop for drive-through food on the way home.  We’ll share food costs for camp (if applicable) or we’ll eat out if we’re staying at a motel.
  • Hunters will be expected to bring their own corn and/or hog bait or contribute money to help fill the feeders (if applicable) and fill the game cameras with batteries (if applicable).

What to Bring:

  • Hunting license.
  • Weapon of choice and ammo (note that some ranches limit what weapon and/or ammo you can use and how many shells you can have in your gun; for example, some ranches do not allow buckshot, calibers smaller than .243, or more than three shells in your gun.  The ranchette near Austin is limited to crossbows and .22’s.  For recommendations on guns and ammo see Hog Hunting Basics.
  • Headlamp or cap light.
  • Spotlight for night hunting (optional, as there is a light under the feeder; see Hog Hunting Basics for recommendations).
  • Camo outer hunting clothes (including a face mask or face paint – absolutely essential, unless you’re hunting from an elevated stand).  If rain is predicted bring rain gear.
  • A Thermacell is highly recommended to repel bugs.  Bug sprays are not recommended (hogs will smell it and won’t come anywhere near you).
  • Drinks and snacks (optional; drinks are highly recommended).
  • Camping gear (if we’re camping).
  • Game cleaning tools (knives, sharpeners, saw, loppers, gambrel, and rope) if the ranch doesn’t have them and if it allows hogs to be cleaned on the ranch.
  • A large ice chest to take your hog(s) home in (if you get any) and if the ranch allows hogs to be cleaned on the ranch.
  • Corn and hog bait.  If not bringing corn, contribute money to help fill the feeders (if applicable)
  • AA batteries for the game cameras and C cell batteries for the light on the 5-gallon feeder.  Or contribute money for batteries for the game cameras and feeder light (if applicable).

Randy Rowley has extras of many of the items that are listed above and will happily loan things if you let him know that you would like to borrow something before we leave.  Of course, if you borrow something and break or lose it he will expect reimbursement.

Here is our Hog Hunting Checklist.

Being on this rotation is a privilege and is not an FCS membership benefit.  This rotation is a service to FCS members and guests, but I will not tolerate the below actions.  I can and will remove a person from the rotation for any of the following reasons (this list is not all-inclusive):

  • Not hunting in a safe manner, including deliberately not following my or the guides/outfitters instructions or rules and the FCS Shooting and Hunting Rules.
  • Not paying your fair share of gas and/or food.
  • Not paying for items (that are not yours) that you broke or lost.
  • Not helping.
  • Indicating that he or she will attend a trip and then not showing up.
  • A pattern of being more than a few minutes late.
  • A pattern of canceling at the last minute.
  • Not returning the organizer’s phone calls and/or emails.

The following people who are on the Self-guided Hog Hunt Rotation for 2021 (as stated in How the Rotations Work, the Event Hierarchy applies):

  1. Randy Rowley (Event Coordinator for hunts on the Opiela ranchette near Austin)
  2. Ted Lieb (Ted, Blake, and Isaac prefer to go on hunts together)
  3. Blake Lieb (Ted, Blake, and Isaac prefer to go on hunts together)
  4. Isaac Lieb (Ted, Blake, and Isaac prefer to go on hunts together)
  5. Ian Daniels
  6. Mike Pozhenko
  7. Jonathan Fleming
  8. Don Hebert and his minor son
  9. Jim McGee
  10. Steve Fusco
  11. Burl Fulenwider
  12. Dan Ahlfield
  13. Larry Mitchell
  14. Ken Miller
  15. Zack Elmer
  16. Patrick Kelley
  17. Christian Bana
  18. Steven Babin

Let Raul Pena, Event Coordinator, know if you would like to be added to this rotation by email (his preference) or 210-364-0720.  Individuals added after 2/19/20 will be added to the bottom of the rotation.  Also, let Raul know if you have any questions.  Let Randy know if you have any questions regarding hunting at the Opiela ranchette near Austin by email (his preference) or 512-922-2484.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Apr
09

Ask Randy

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Send your questions to Randy at info@fcs-texas.org.  Questions are in red (bold).  Responses are in black.

Do you know of any company or individuals that do gun bluing work very well?

I had McBride’s Guns do a shotgun barrel for me once.  Saltwater from duck hunting at the coast had started to make the barrel splotchy.  However, within two years it started doing it again.  So I sold that gun and bought a camo one.

My cousin wants to come to Texas and go fishing with me.  Where do you suggest I take him and when do you think is the best time?

If you plan to bank fish, here is a list of Fishing Holes in the Austin Area.  Be aware that I haven’t updated the list since May 2019.

Mornings are usually best, as they wake up hungry.  Spring is generally the best time of year to fish.  Before the spawn, they’re eating like crazy to survive the spawn.  Bedded bass rarely eat during the spawn.  After the spawn, they’re trying to regain their lost weight.  They’ll spawn when the water temperature hits 60 degrees.   They usually spawn in mid to late March in central Texas.

Rather than bank fish or rent a boat, I recommend hiring a guide.  I highly recommend Ander Meine of Bassquash Fishing.  He’s a great teacher.

I also might be able to take the two of you on a non-FCS Self-chartered Freshwater Fishing Trip Rotation trip (I wouldn’t be able to bump you up in the Rotation), but it will have to fit my schedule, and, as you know, I’m fairly busy.  I guarantee you that we wouldn’t do as well as y’all would with Ander.

Do you use Loctite to keep fiberoptic shotgun sights from pivoting right or left?

I use Loctite Blue (removable) for my fiberoptic shotgun sights.  By so doing, if I decide that I want to try another one later, the old sight is easier to get off.

I know you duck hunt Granger, but have you ever bass fished it?  If you have, could you tell me anything about it?  Where did you put in?  Did you ever fish the river?

TPWD rates it poor for largemouths.  See Fishing Granger Lake.  I’ve never caught a largemouth there – only white bass.  It’s an excellent crappie and catfish lake.

The entire lake is surrounded by Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) – Sorefinger, Pecan Grove (below the dam), San Gabriel, and Willis Creek and parks Fox, Taylor, Willis Creek, and Friendship (going clockwise from the dam).  Here is a map of the lake – https://www.swf-wc.usace.army.mil/granger/Brochures/Granger%20Lake%20Map.pdf.

The San Gabriel WMA has a lot of stumps and trees in the water and the Willis Creek WMA has a lot of trees in the water. Straying from the channel in the San Gabriel WMA and on the San Gabriel River is foolish.  I usually hit six stumps on my way (at idle speed) to where we hunt in the dark and hit six more on the way back to the ramp in the daylight.  I’ve seen bass boats blowing through the channel at 50 MPH, which borders on suicidal.

The lake’s water level varies considerably, so there are plenty of stumps that you can see when the lake is at its normal pool but if the lake raises a foot or two you won’t’ see them, and then – Wham!

Therefore, I recommend that you fish the Sorefinger WMA if you still want to fish it.  It has a lot fewer trees and stumps.  There is a 24-hour ramp at Friendship Park, which is on the east border of the Sorefinger WMA.  It’s on FM 971, near the dam.

You would think that with all the timber that the bass fishing would be good, but that’s definitely not the case.

Where I can get hog hunting lights like yours, either red or green?

The green one (see picture below), a Moultrie, screws into the bottom of my 5-gallon Moultrie feeder.  I got it at Tractor Supply online (at https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/moultrie-feeder-hog-light?cm_mmc=SEM-_-Google-_-DynamicAdGroups-_-AllSiteTSCExtAd&gclid=Cj0KCQjwhIP6BRCMARIsALu9Lfmh3J5Qf4xQYroB2X3MxHPV-2AJcac9z0BdMn_W5P6xDzt-71wis6AaAvRYEALw_wcB) for $40 in the early summer of 2020.  Academy also sells them.  They operate on four C cell batteries.  I read that their motion detector is iffy, but it works on mine.  Mine died after six months but Moultire sent me a new one.

I’ve had the red three-light unit (see picture below) for 15 years or so.  I got it at www.texasboars.com and paid $123 at the time.  Since then they have continued to improve them and their prices have skyrocketed.  They now start at $185.  Their top of the line one will illuminate 5500 square yards  – see https://texasboars.com/shop/rv618-cct-custom-p-147.html.  Here is their less expensive version – https://texasboars.com/shop/rv609-cct-custom-p-145.html.  The one that I have doesn’t have a motion detector feature.  You just clip the alligator clips on a 12-volt battery.  It also works on a 6-volt battery, but not well – the one time that I used a 6-volt battery I couldn’t see my crosshairs in my scope.

I’m really impressed with these guys’ feeder mechanisms, so I’ll bet their lights are great too.  See https://www.allseasonsfeeders.com/collections/huniting-accessories.  This one is solar-powered – https://www.allseasonsfeeders.com/collections/huniting-accessories/products/asf-boar-light-xt.  Here is it’s little brother – https://www.allseasonsfeeders.com/collections/huniting-accessories/products/lil-squealerHere’s another light that they’re out of – https://www.ebay.com/itm/202755374799.

I and several other FCS guys own and love KillLight250 flashlights made by Elusive Wildlife Technologies.  Here are a few of their hog lights:

This picture was taken from 15 yards away (zoomed).

This picture was taken from 20 yards away.

What is the best fish finder to buy under 1K?  I looked at the Garmin Echomap.

Lowrance, Humminbird, and Garmin are the Ford’s, Chevy’s, and Dodge’s of the fish finder world.  You really can’t go wrong with any of them.

I have the Humminbird Helix 7.  My Minn Kota trolling motor is supposed to plot using the Helix, but I’ve never messed with it, as it’s on my center console.

A couple of friends love the Garmin Livescope, but they’re $2,500.

Here are some articles:

My son and I have never been deer hunting and were hoping to go this winter.  I do not see any events on your calendar for this.  Is that correct?  If you do not have a deer hunting event, where do you recommend going for beginners?

We don’t have much demand for deer day hunts.  In our 31-year history, we have had five deer day hunts.  The vast majority of the guys in the Club who deer hunt are on season-long or year-round leases.  The problem with day hunt ranches is a lot of them are over hunted and, therefore, you don’t see many deer.

Here are four websites that advertise leases (including day leases):

And here are six Facebook Groups that advertise leases (you must join the groups):

  • Texas Hunting & Deer Leases
  • Texas Hunting and Deer Leases (they ripped off the first site’s name)
  • Texas Hunting Leases and Day Hunts
  • Texas Hunting Leases and Outfitters
  • Texas Hunting Guides & Outfitters
  • Texas Cheap Hunts and Fishing (this site tends to focus on day hunts)

Unfortunately, I don’t have a specific ranch/outfitter that I can recommend to you.  My advice is to find ones at the locations that you want to hunt in (or the distance that you want to travel) and within your price range and Google reviews on them.  If there have been bad experiences, people are quick to let the world know.  Generally speaking, South Texas has the biggest deer and is the most expensive, Central Texas has the most deer, and West Texas, East Texas, and the Panhandle have the fewest deer.

Fort Hood allows deer hunting, but with quite a few strict rules, as one would expect on an Army base, such as you can’t go beyond sight of your blind while looking for a wounded deer and they will pick you up at a specific time (and you had better be where you’re supposed to be at that time).  Hunters hunt from box blinds.  See https://fthood.isportsman.net/.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers also offers deer hunts on some of their lakes.  See https://www.swf-wc.usace.army.mil/lake/SWF_Hunting_Guide_Final_2020_2021.pdf.

I’ve also read about good hunts on the Caddo/LBJ Grasslands.

I’ve done a lot of walk-in duck hunting up at Granger and the coast and have had a lot of trouble with hunters setting up on top of me.  Obviously, that’s public hunting at its finest.  Do you have any recommended walk-in areas where you’ve done well?

Granger – that’s a tough one, as the entire lake (except the parks) can be walked into, as it’s surrounded by Wildlife Management Areas (WMA’s).  However, the San Gabriel WMA gets less traffic than the Sore Finger and Willis Creek WMAs.  The problem there is if you go up the river you’ll be setting out your dekes where guys drive their boats.  I’d park at the end of CR 378 (Number 5 on https://www.swf-wc.usace.army.mil/granger/Brochures/Granger%20Lake%20Map.pdf). Also see https://www.google.com/maps/@30.6860252,-97.4030205,14z?hl=en.  Granger gets a lot of traffic from Austin hunters.

The Coast – walking in at the coast is a whole lot tougher as the bottom can be really sticky.  I’ve seen walk-in hunters at Wilson’s Cut on Hwy 361 between Corpus Christi and Port A (about five miles north of Corpus Christi).

Here are other lakes that I’ve done walk-in hunts at:

Belton – tougher as there are only three WMA’s where you can walk in – Owl Creek WMA (very tough walking with lots of trees and vines to trip over if you come in from Grove Road – so come in from Owl Creek Park – https://www.google.com/maps/@31.2234113,-97.5270029,15z?hl=en), White Flint WMA (https://www.google.com/maps/@31.2337599,-97.4790235,15z?hl=en – the problem with this area is the water by shore can be too deep for your dekes; there’s a pond in that WMA that sometimes has water in it, but it’s surrounded by trees, which makes shooting challenging), and Iron Bridge WMA (https://www.google.com/maps/@31.304313,-97.4931195,15z?hl=en but you’ll have the same problem there as you will going up the San Gabriel on Granger – the river will be too skinny to set out decoys).  Also, Belton has some of the stickiest mud that I’ve ever encountered.  Belton gets a lot of traffic from Fort Hood hunters.  See https://www.swf-wc.usace.army.mil/belton/images/BELTON_LAKE_OVERALL_RECREATION_MAP.pdf for more details.

Stillhouse Hollow – Even tougher as there are only two WMA’s to walk in to – at the end of Union Grove Road in the Union Grove WMA – https://www.google.com/maps/@31.0117237,-97.5982209,16z?hl=en and south and west of Cedar Gap Park (https://www.google.com/maps/@31.016002,-97.6527159,15z?hl=en – it’s a long walk to get to huntable areas and if you go up the river in a boat you’ll run into the same problem that you’ll find going up the San Gabriel on Granger or in the Iron Bridge WMA on Belton – you’ll be putting your dekes out where guys will come through with their boats).  The point to the north in the Union Grove WMA is a good spot, but if you want to get away from the other hunters, head east.  Stillhouse gets a lot of traffic from Fort Hood hunters.  See https://www.swf-wc.usace.army.mil/stillhouse/images/STILLHOUSE_HOLLOW_OVERALL_RECREATION_MAP.pdf for more details.

Somerville – the toughest as there is only one day hunt area to walk in to – the “cup bottom” to the east of the end of Iron Bridge Rd. (https://www.google.com/maps/@30.2901251,-96.6281178,16z?hl=en).  The shortest walk involves parking at the end of Iron Bridge Rd. and heading east.  Be aware that it’s almost as thick there as it is at the Owl Creek WMA, so skirt the shore if you can.  You can also park at the end of Frischer Rd., but it’s a longer walk to get to the “cup bottom” to the west (see https://www.google.com/maps/@30.2898657,-96.619685,16z?hl=en).  Somerville gets a lot of traffic from College Station hunters.  See https://www.swf-wc.usace.army.mil/somerville/Information/Waterfowl%20Hunting%20Lake%20Map.pdf for more details.

As to how I’ve done:

  • Granger – three good walk-in hunts in the San Gabriel WMA.
  • Stillhouse Hollow – one good walk-in hunt in the Union Grove WMA.
  • Belton and Somerville – no good walk-in hunts.  In fact, for Belton, I’ve had no good hunts via boat either and for Somerville, I’ve had one good hunt via boat (it was in the walk-in area before I knew that you had to hunt from shore in that area).

So, I’d focus on Granger and Stillhouse Hollow for walk-in hunts.

You must possess the Annual Public Hunting Permit to hunt Granger.  The other three do not require it (unless you go into the boats-only section of Somerville (with a boat) that is leased by the TPWD).  Here is the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Fort Worth District Hunting Guide.

My massage guy’s brother has started manufacturing 9mm with some Army friends as a business and has a large capacity press.  I am considering buying a brick of 500 9mm 115-grain bullets for $350.  What are other details I should ask and know before deciding?  The projectile type, powder measurements, etc.?  Do you know of a reliable source for ammo that I should review first?

The pressure of the rounds should not be greater than the recommended maximum pressure – 35,000 psi.  However, as these are undoubtedly target rounds (FMJ) that shouldn’t be a problem.  Another thing to be concerned about is the cases.  Brass cases are preferred, followed by aluminum, then steel.  Some guns have trouble chambering and/or ejecting aluminum and/or steel cased ammo.  As these are Army guys I’d bet my lunch that they’ll be brass.

Lastly, foreign components (cases, powder, primers, and bullets) can be a concern.  However, again, as these are Army guys I’d bet my lunch and dinner that everything is at military specifications (Mil-Spec) and made in the USA.

Be aware that some gun manufacturers will void their warranty if you shoot non-factory ammo and especially if you shoot reloads.  Your gun’s manufacturer may consider these shells to be reloaded.  I recommend that you read your warranty and check with your gun’s manufacturer if in doubt.

Gunbroker has a lot of ammo for sale from businesses and individuals.  Most are in cases of 10 or more boxes.  They have auctions like eBay and “Buy it now.”  That price is in line with prices that I’ve seen on Gunbroker.  Academy, when it has them, doesn’t allow you to buy more than three boxes.

David Featherston shared the following:

Just FYI, I’ve found Academy (in Sunset Valley on Brodie Lane) to be the BEST price on 9mm ammo these days (Federal, Winchester, etc. brands).  I just bought a box of 200 (full metal jacket) for $49.99 and a box of 100 for $26.99.  You just need to call ahead of time to see if it is in stock for a certain morning during the week.  They accommodate folks by opening at 8:30 vs. 9:00 am only for ammo seekers.  Their limit is 3 people at a time, so you need to start standing in line about 8:00 or 8:15.  They limit you to 3 boxes of any kind… no matter the quantity in the box.  The Brodie Lane store says that Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday mornings are typically when they have new stock ready to sell.

They’re not gouging anyone and I sure appreciate that!  (I tell them each time I go.)

What baitcaster rod and reel combo is your pick?  Do you do a right-handed or left-handed retrieve?

I don’t spend more than $100 for a rod/reel combo.  To me, there’s not much difference between a $100 combo and a $150 combo in performance.

Bass Pro Shops

This one has good reviews, including one from a beginner – https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/bass-pro-shops-100187478.  I’d get the 7′ medium rod strength (Jack-of-all-trades) version.

This one also had good reviews – https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/abu-garcia-mlf-baitcast-combo.  It only comes in a 7′ version.  Get the medium instead of the medium-heavy rod.

But if you’re willing to spend more then this is the one to get – https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/Abu-Garcia-Revo-SXBass-Pro-Shops-Johnny-Morris-CarbonLite-20-Baitcast-Rod-and-Reel-Combo.  The Revo has an excellent reputation.  Its drawbacks are the rod only comes in medium-heavy and it’s out of stock.

Academy

Lew’s combos (they have a good reputation) that are worth looking at include:

https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/lews-speed-spool-lfs-7-ft-mh-baitcast-rod-and-reel-combo#repChildCatid=8216508.  It has three 5-star reviews.  It comes with a 7′ rod, in medium-heavy only.

https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/lews-mach-smash-slp-6-ft-10-in-mh-baitcast-combo#repChildCatid=8190502.  Similar reviews to the first one and it’s $20 cheaper.  It comes with a 6′ 10″ rod, in medium-heavy only.

https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/lews%C2%AE-american-hero%C2%AE-7-mh-baitcast-rod-and-reel-combo#repChildCatid=1480325.  It’s cheaper than the last one but has better reviews.  It comes with a 7′ rod, in medium-heavy only.

https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/lews-laser-txs-6-ft-10-in-mh-baitcast-rod-and-reel-combo#repChildCatid=7988009.   It comes with a 6′ 10″ rod, in medium-heavy only.

For rods, I go by feel.  I fake cast them in the store.  If it feels like a broom handle or like a whip I put it back on the rack.  Both Bass Pro Shops and Academy have sales on combos frequently.  Academy sometimes runs all of their combos 25% off.

Probably 95% of right-handed guys go with a right-handed retrieve.  However, some don’t like casting the rod with their right hand and then switching it to their left hand to hold it while the right-hand is retrieving the lure, as that takes a couple of seconds of precious fishing time to make that switch.  To me, it feels awkward to retrieve with my left hand.  However, that may just be because that’s the way I’ve always done it.  Try them both and see what feels best for you.

What bullet types should I use for a .300 Blackout AAC for hog hunting?

It’s important to know when using a .300 Blackout to hunt medium-sized game such as hogs and deer, that it is a short-range caliber.  Supersonic ammo is limited to 200 yards and subsonic ammo is limited to 150 yards or less.

The .300 Blackout was designed to provide a bullet that was a more viable medium-sized option for the AR platform than a .223, which was originally designed for varmints.  It was also designed to shoot suppressed and when it comes to suppressors, slower is better.  A subsonic round lacks the supersonic crack.  A suppressor only stops the blast at the muzzle – it does nothing for the supersonic crack.  A subsonic round through a suppressor is nice and quiet – although not movie-quiet.  A supersonic round through a suppressor defeats the purpose of the suppressor.

So, if you’re going to use a suppressor then use subsonic rounds, which is what they were designed for.  And if you’re going to shoot subsonic rounds then you need to do headshots (behind the eye to the ear – some guys shoot them in the ear) because the bullet is moving too slow to expand.  By doing so you’ll either kill them instantly and they’ll take a “dirt nap” or you’ll miss and they’ll run away.  Tracking a wounded hog at night is not easy and potentially dangerous.  A headshot eliminates the need to track.

With headshots, especially on big hogs with thick skulls, penetration is key.  If you shoot a hog with a bullet that is designed for the vitals (e.g., a hollow point or expanding soft point) it may flatten on the skull and not penetrate or adequately penetrate.  The solution is a solid, non-expanding bullet, such as a full metal jacket (FMJ).  This is where subsonic rounds with solid bullets really shine.

A 190+ grain solid core bullet in a .300 Blackout (such as a Sellier & Bellot Subsonic FMJ 200 grain) is moving a lot slower (1060 Feet Per Second – FPS) than a 125 grain or 110 grain expanding bullet (which travel at around 2200 FPS).  It is, without a doubt, the best bullet for head shooting hogs.  But you never want to use a FMJ for shooting hogs or deer in the vitals, as they don’t expand and that won’t ensure humane kills.  Some ammo makers make subsonic hollow points for the .300 blackout but those bullets are designed to be shot into the vitals, not the head.  The criticism of them is they don’t adequately expand to ensure a one-shot kill.

If you’re not using a suppressor then an expanding fast bullet is the way to go, such as the copper Barnes VOR-TX Tipped Triple-Shock X Hollow Point 110 grain.  Barnes is a premium ammo maker and the VOR-TX Tipped Triple-Shock X Hollow Point comes at a premium price ($40 for 20 rounds, if you can find it).  With that bullet and similar ones, you should shoot hogs and deer in the vitals where the bullet’s expanding qualities can be maximized.  As it penetrates it’s also going to expand.  As it expands it leaves a wake of destruction which increases your chances of a one-hit kill.  This is a humane round that will put a hog or deer down without issue if you shoot it in the vitals.  Just don’t shoot a hog in the head with one.

I want to buy a rifle and scope for hog hunting.  I’d prefer for it to kick less than a .243.  My budget is $1500.

I do not recommend anything below a .243 with a 100-grain bullet for hogs.  As you would like something that kicks a little less than a .243, going with a lesser caliber in a bolt action, pump, or lever action is not the answer.  The problem with .224 bullets, such as the .223/5.56, is they were designed for varmints (just look at the boxes of their typical 55-grain ammo and they’ll tell you what they were designed for).  Over the years the ammo makers developed heavier bullets for those calibers (typically 64-grain and up) to make them usable for deer and up to deer-sized hogs.  But if a 300 lb.+ hog comes to your bait I would want to be holding something with more power.  You can kill hogs with .22’s but you have to hit them in the ear or just behind it, which is not easy to do in the dark (which is usually when hogs are out and about) and with their frequently moving heads.

A semi-auto will kick less than a bolt action, pump, or lever action (I guarantee you that a .300 Blackout in an AR will kick less than a bolt action .243).  Browning (BAR), Remington (Model 7500), and Benelli (R1) make semi-automatic rifles but none of them are as accurate or customizable as AR’s.

Typical AR’s are offered in calibers that are good choices for hogs.  These include (in my order of preference):

  1. .300 Blackout AAC (commonly called .300 Blackout) – it’s .308 caliber and the .223 is the parent cartridge (you can use these shells in .223 magazines).  It was designed to shoot suppressed with subsonic rounds.  It’s not a long-range cartridge, but hog hunting is not a long-range sport.  I bought one a couple of months ago and can’t wait to try it out on a piggie.  It hardly kicks at all and I don’t have a suppressor on mine (yet).  With a suppressor on it, the recoil will be minimal.
  2. 6.5mm Creedmoor (commonly called 6.5 Creedmoor) – was actually developed in 2007 but is just becoming popular now.  It has a reputation for long-range accuracy.  It is a great caliber for hogs.  When I go to Academy I almost always see it on their shelves.  I see more discussions on it than any other caliber in the FB groups that I’m a member of.  There are many who think that it’s the cat’s meow.  It’s #2 on my list as it probably will kick more than the .300 Blackout and it’s not designed for suppressors.
  3. .308 Winchester (very similar but not identical to the military 7.62x51mm NATO) – a fantastic caliber that can put down anything on this continent.  It has had two offspring – 7mm-08 and .243 and has very similar ballistics to the .30-06.  The one knock on it is AR’s that are chambered for it are not cheap (they’re called AR-10’s).  It’s #3 on my list due to the cost of the rifles.
  4. 6.5mm Grendle and 6.8mm Remington Special Purpose Cartridge (AKA 6.8 SPC, 6.8 SPC II, and 6.8×43mm – has the .30 Remington as its parent cartridge) are both great calibers for hogs but ammo for them is very hard to find right now and expensive.  A gun is no good if you can’t find ammo for it.

Remington makes an AR (the R-25) with typical deer calibers (.243 Winchester, 7mm-08 Remington, .308 Winchester) but it’s very expensive ($1700 for just the rifle) and hard to find.

As to AR’s, there are several that have good reputations, including Colt, Bushmaster, SIG, Daniel Defense, Anderson, Springfield Armory, Ruger, DPMS, and many more.  But after a lot of research, I settled on two – the Diamondback DB15 and the CORE CORE15.  I watched a lot of YouTube reviews and read a lot of reviews and it was hard to find any that said anything that was less than flattering.  Best of all they have the best warranties in the industry.

I settled on the Diamondback DB15 in .300 Blackout as they were cheaper than the CORE and I only had 1K to spend (which is what I sold my O/U Classic Doubles shotgun for).  I got it new on Gunbroker for $655 (plus $25 shipping and a $20 FFL receiving fee).  I added a SIG Romeo 5 Red Dot ($132), two Magpul rail sections ($31 total), a Surefire flashlight (M300 is $269; mine was given to me by my son), a Magpul angled foregrip ($45; mine was given to me by my son), an EZshoot 2 Point Sling and Quick Release Sling Mount ($24), Tool Parts 1pcs Quick Detach Clamp-on Single Point Sling Swivel Attachment Buffer Tube Adapter – CN (a better place to attached your sling) ($15), and three 30-round  Magpul P-mags ($36).  So, I spent $941 on the above and my remaining $59 on ammo.

It has the following features:

  • Pistol Length Gas Impingement System
  • 4140 Chrome-Moly Free Float Barrel
  • 1:8 Twist
  • A2 Flash Hider
  • 15″ Diamondback Aluminum Key Mod Handguard
  • Shot-Peened, MPI Mil Spec 8620 Bolt Carrier
  • A3 Flattop Forged 7075 T6 Aluminum, T-Marked Upper
  • Forged 7075 T6 Aluminum Lower
  • Collapsible Stock
  • A2 Pistol Grip
  • Anodized Black Finish
  • Weight 6.65 Pounds
  • Length 32.5″-36.25″

As to scopes, given your budget, you won’t be able to afford a Day/Night scope if you get everything that I listed above (although you won’t need the Red Dot and can do without the flashlight and three extra magazines for a hog hunting rifle).  But if you can swing it I’d get an ATN X-sight 4K Pro 3-14X for $650 (you can get a refurbished one with a full factory warranty – the same as a new one – at Walmart for $100 less).

But if that breaks the bank I’d get a Vortex Crossfire II Hog Hunter 3-12X56 with a 30mm tube, and V-brite illuminated reticle.  Amazon has them for $300.

For either of these options, you’ll need a cantilever style mount made for an AR-15 such as the Burris Optics P.E.P.R. Scope Mount, Includes Both Smooth and Picatinny Ring Tops, 30mm ($90 on Amazon).  The cool thing about using the Picatinny ring tops is it allows you to put a Red Dot on the Picatinny ring top (on top of the scope).  This will give you precision shots with the scope at standing still hogs and shots at running hogs with the Red Dot.  Don’t spend more money on the quick-detach version of the mount – you won’t need it (it’s for guys who put a rifle scope on their AR one day and a Red Dot on it the next).

Instead of the Surefire Weapons Light (which is used primarily for home defense), I’d get an Odepro KL52Plus Zoomable Hunting Flashlight with Red Green White and IR850 Light LED Lamps Remote Pressure Switch Hunting Kit.  Amazon has them for $101.  Use the green lamp.

In summary, I recommend the following for a hog hunting rifle:

$700 – Diamondback DB-15 in .300 Blackout AAC

$650 – ATN X-sight 4K Pro 3-14X

$90 – Burris Optics P.E.P.R. Scope Mount, Includes Both Smooth and Picatinny Ring Tops, 30mm

$101 – Odepro KL52Plus Zoomable Hunting Flashlight with Red Green White and IR850 Light LED Lamps Remote Pressure Switch Hunting Kit

$16 – Magpul rail section (to hold the foregrip)

$45 – Magpul angled foregrip

$15 – Tool Parts 1pcs Quick Detach Clamp-on Single Point Sling Swivel Attachment Buffer Tube Adapter – CN

$24 – EZshoot 2 Point Sling and Quick Release Sling Mount

$1641

If you swap the Vortex Crossfire II for the ATN you’d be at $1291, which would give you plenty of money left over for ammo and be below $1500.

For other options see:

My son lives in Seattle and wants to hunt deer and elk.  He wants some advice and any possible leads you might have for a good gun to use.  Do you recommend new or used?  What’s a good all-around gun with abundant and cheaper ammo?  30-06?   Plastic or wood stock?  Best reasonable scope?

Here are a couple of articles that will get you started:

I haven’t updated the first article since 2009, so the prices for those guns are higher now.  Also, there are different versions of the manufacturers’ rifles or they offer new rifles entirely.  For example, Browning now offers an X-bolt, which is basically an A-bolt on steroids.

I updated the second article on 9/10/20.  I will eventually update the first article.

As to calibers, since elk is in the equation, I’d recommend at least a .270 or 7mm08.  I’d definitely go with the more popular calibers, especially right now, as there has been a substantial ammo shortage and your odds of finding ammo for a .280 Remington (for example) will be lower.  They’ve been making .30-06 since 1906 and it comes in bullet weights from 110 – 220 grains.  I’d use 150 – 165 grain on deer and 180 grain on elk.  The 6.5 Creedmore has become a very popular caliber and I see several boxes of it every time that I go to Academy.  It’s supposed to be a flat shooter.  But it’s only 0.2559, which would be iffy on elk (a .270 Winchester is actually .277).  My order of preference would be .30-06, .308 (very available ammo and just slightly less performance than the ’06), and .270.

I’d go with a bolt action, as I’m a traditionalist.  However, I recently bought an AR in .300 Blackout for hogs, and if the riots come to my neighborhood.  For years I despised them and called them “toy guns.”  But I’m starting to like it and upgrading parts and adding things is fun.  The problem with an AR is most are chambered in .223/5.56 which was designed for varmints (but they make a few deer capable bullets for it).  .300 Blackout is a short-range cartridge.  6.5 Grendle is very hard to find and expensive.  The ammo is very hard to find.  .308 would be your best bet but those AR-10’s are expensive.  Remington makes an AR with typical deer calibers but it’s very expensive.  Pumps aren’t as accurate.  Neither are lever actions with the exceptions of the Browning BLR and the Savage Model 99.  Lever actions have mostly short-ranged calibers (with the above exceptions).  All of the bolt guns in my article are accurate, reliable, and similarly priced.  The Remington will be the most readily available.  I have a Model 700 BDL but if I were buying today I’d buy the CDL with the box magazine.

As to where to find one – I’m seeing more rifles show up at Academy.  I’ve also had good luck on www.gunbroker.com  I’ve bought five guns there and sold three.  It’s like eBay.  There are auctions and “Buy it Now.”  You must have the rifle shipped to an FFL dealer (my son is now one, in Liberty Hill).  Gunbroker has a list of FFL dealers per state.  They all do the same service, so I’d go with the cheapest one.  For example, Ryan charges $20 to receive a gun.  Find the rifle you want and shop.  It doesn’t take long to find the best price.  Just know that what guys are asking for on gunbroker is often not what the going rate is.  Some guys ask a high price and are counting on guys who don’t like to shop or are impulsive.  Follow/watch some auctions that are going on for the gun you want.  When it sells it will show you what it sold for.

I bought a Browning Gold shotgun on eBay for $480 several years ago.  The going price at the time was $750.  The reason that it was cheaper was it came only with one screw-in full choke.  After I receive it I bought two new chokes (Improved Cylinder and Modified) at Academy for $20 each and had a complete gun for $520.  But I was patient – I looked for around six months to find that diamond in the rough.

I’m not averse to buying a used gun, although I’d avoid used AR’s.  They’re often shot to hell and back and you just never know what’s about to break.  There aren’t too many things that can break on a bolt-action.  If you use gunbroker you’ll get it in the mail, unless you can find one where they’re selling it where you live and allow it to be picked up.  Texas Gun Trader is 100% face-to-face exchanges.  So, if you buy a used one from gunbroker make sure that the ad allows an examination period/return policy. You might need to send it back if it is not in the condition that was advertised.  Good sellers will post several pictures of the gun they’re selling.  Beware of stock photos unless it’s new.  If you see that a new rifle is only $50 or so more than a used one buy it as you’ll get the warranty.

I’m a wood and blue steel guy but have come to appreciate synthetic.  For rifles, it doesn’t change the point of impact from the weather changing, which wood is notorious for.  So if you get wood make sure that the barrel has been floated (you should be able to slide a dollar bill all the way down the length of it).  I’m also a big fan of 2.5 – 3.5 lb. triggers.  Most factory triggers are set at 7.5 lbs. to avoid lawsuits.  A trigger job makes a rifle much more accurate.

I go into copious details in my Choosing a Scope article.  As he won’t be hunting hogs a 3-9X40 will be adequate.  I really like Vortex and Burris.  They both have forever warranties.  I have a Vortex Crossfire II 3-9X50 with an illuminated V-bright dot in the reticle on my deer rifle.  It cost me $209 new.  Optics Planet is a good place to get optics.  As is Midway USA, Natchez Shooting Supply, and even Amazon (which has competitive prices).  Find the scope you want and shop.  As with rifles, it doesn’t take long to find the best price.

What depths do the lures in the below pictures run?

On the top are plastic worms with some brass and beads for Carolina rigging and what looks like spinnerbait trailer hooks.  Worms will not sink unless you use a worm weight to make them sink.  Here is an assortment – https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/bass-pro-shops-xps-60-piece-worm-weight-kit?hvarAID=shopping_googleproductextensions&affcode_c=&gclid=CjwKCAjwyo36BRAXEiwA24CwGfb5QuvO-GMBTNJ-asJtcPPOy0vEZbXdRBdK7aq6VFFmFZfSUw_vehoCOuAQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

Rigging tips – https://www.wideopenspaces.com/4-ways-to-rig-a-worm-weight/.

Texas rig – https://shopkarls.com/blog/texas-rig-101-need-know-t-rig/.

Carolina rig – https://officiallakeforktrophybass.com/how-to-setup-a-carolina-rig/.  Brass weights work best for Carolina rigs.  See https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/bass-pro-shops-carolina-weights.

How quickly they sink depends on the weight you choose, which depends on the wind and worm size/weight.  They’ll eventually sink to the bottom.  Worm fishing is a very slow way to fish.  Be sure to use offset gap worm hooks in sizes 2/0 – 5/0 and not the spinnerbait trailer hooks that are in the picture.

The two square-bill crankbaits below the worms will run 4 – 6′ deep.  They’re great to use around trees and rocks, as they bounce off structure.  They, and round-bill crankbaits, only sink when you start to retrieve them.  Fish them medium to fast.  The faster you retrieve them the deeper they sink.  Stop and go is a good technique for them.  Stop the retrieve, wait for a second or two, then start it again.  The stop and go method makes bass think the baitfish is wounded.  They’ll often hit it when it stops.  However, don’t stop it for too long as it will float back up to the surface.

Categories : Ask Randy
Comments (0)
Apr
09

Hog Hunt Rotation (Semi-guided)

Posted by: | Comments (0)

The following is a rotation list for semi-guided hog hunts.

Here are a few pictures from our most successful hunts:

Costs:

  • Hunt fee.
  • Hog cleaning fees (if applicable).
  • Hunting license.
  • Weapon of choice and ammo (note that some ranches limit what weapon and/or ammo you can use and how many shells you can have in your gun; for example, some ranches do not allow buckshot, calibers smaller than .243, or more than three shells in your gun.  For recommendations on guns and ammo see Hog Hunting Basics.
  • Headlamp or cap light.
  • Spotlight for night hunting (see Hog Hunting Basics).
  • Camo outer hunting clothes (including a face mask or face paint – absolutely essential).  If rain is predicted bring rain gear.
  • A Thermacell is highly recommended to repel bugs.  Bug sprays are not recommended (hogs will smell it and won’t come anywhere near you).
  • Drinks and snacks (optional; drinks are highly recommended).
  • Camping gear (if we’re camping).
  • Game cleaning tools (knives, sharpeners, saw, loppers, etc.).
  • A large ice chest to take your hog(s) home in (if you get any).
  • Corn, if the ranch requires it.  Hog bait is also recommended.

Randy Rowley has extras of many of the items that are listed above and will happily loan things if you let him know that you would like to borrow something before you leave.  Of course, if you borrow something and break or lose it he will expect reimbursement.

Here is our Hog Hunting Checklist.

Being on this rotation is a privilege and is not an FCS membership benefit.  This rotation is a service to FCS members and guests, but I will not tolerate the below actions.  I can and will remove a person from the rotation for any of the following reasons (this list is not all-inclusive):

  • Not hunting in a safe manner, including deliberately not following my or the guides/outfitters instructions or rules and the FCS Shooting and Hunting Rules.
  • Not paying your fair share of gas and/or food.
  • Not paying for items (that are not yours) that you broke or lost.
  • Not helping.
  • Indicating that he or she will attend a trip and then not showing up.
  • A pattern of being more than a few minutes late.
  • A pattern of canceling at the last minute.
  • Not returning the organizer’s phone calls and/or emails.

The following people who are on the Semi-guided Hog Hunt Rotation for 2021 (as stated in How the Rotations Work, the Event Hierarchy applies):

  1. Mike Smith
  2. Steve Fusco
  3. Ted Lieb (Ted, Blake, and Isaac Lieb prefer to go on hunts together)
  4. Blake Lieb (Blake, Ted, and Isaac Lieb prefer to go on hunts together)
  5. Isaac Lieb (Isaac, Ted and Blake Lieb prefer to go on hunts together)
  6. Jim McGee
  7. Robert Ochoa
  8. Monalisa Almanza and one of her minor sons
  9. Larry Mitchell
  10. Jose Primera
  11. Jonathan Fleming
  12. Greg Moerbe
  13. Dan Ahlfield
  14. Burl Fulenwider
  15. Edwin Zamora
  16. Mike Pozhenko
  17. Don Hebert and his minor son
  18. Patrick Kelley
  19. Christian Bana
  20. Steven Babin
  21. Randy Rowley
  22. Ken Miller

Let Raul Pena know if you would like to be added to this rotation by sending an email (his preference) or at 210-364-0720.  Individuals added after 2/19/20 will be placed at the bottom of the rotation.  Also, let Raul know if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

A self-chartered fishing trip or self-guided hunt does not involve a professional guide or a guide fee.

A semi-guided hunt involves a guide, outfitter, or landowner and a hunt fee.  Usually, they just show the hunters were the blinds and cleaning station are and where to dump the guts.

A chartered fishing trip or guided hunt involves a professional guide who fishes/or hunts (as applicable) with his clients.  They involve a guide fee.

For all of the above types of events, we attempt to split the vehicle and boat gas (if applicable; the amount depends on the distance traveled and the number of people sharing the gas), state or county park fees (if applicable), boat launch fees (if applicable), and toll road fees (if applicable).  There is also food, lodging (if applicable), and bait (if applicable) costs.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Apr
07

4/10/21 Semi-guided Hog Hunt

Posted by: | Comments (0)

FCS will host a Semi-guided Hog Hunt on 4/10/21 at the 200 acre Pena family ranch near Mexia.  The ranch has a large stock tank (pond), a creek that runs to it, and lots of trees that line the creek.

The cost of the hunt is $50 per hog.  Hunters will need to bring their own pop-up or stick blinds and a sack of corn each.  Presently, there are no feeders or accommodations on the property.

The maximum number of hunters that we can bring is four, counting Raul Pena.  We are full.

Contact Raul if you’d like to be added to the the Semi-guided Hog Hunt Rotation.  That Rotation and the Event Hierarchy will apply to hunts at the ranch.

Also contact Raul at his email address or 210-364-0720 if you’d like to be added to the Rotation, or placed on his waiting list in case someone drops out of if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

The next FCS Self-chartered Freshwater Fishing Trip will be on Wednesday, 4/21/21, probably on Lake Somerville.

Costs (as per the Self-chartered Freshwater Fishing Trip Rotation):

  • The participants (excluding me) will split the vehicle and boat gas and park entrance fee (if there is one).
  • We’ll stop at Whataburger on the way to the lake and will probably stop for brunch on the way home.
  • Fishermen can use artificial lures and/or buy live and/or dead bait.

Note that due to the Texas Mobility Authority overcharging Randy’s family $400 on toll bills, he will no longer use toll roads.  Therefore, we’ll have to leave earlier.

The Self-chartered Freshwater Fishing Trip Rotation and the Event Hierarchy apply.

This event is full.  Contact Randy Rowley you would like to be added to his contact list in case someone drops out, if you’d like to be added to the Self-chartered Freshwater Fishing Trip Rotation, or if you have any questions at randywrowley@gmail.com or 512-922-2484.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

FCS will host a Semi-guided Hog Hunt on 4/23/21 – 4/25/21 with Ricky Ethridge on a 2,000 acre ranch near Rocksprings.  We have had many successful duck hunts with Ricky and know that he’s a stand-up guy.

The cost of the hunt is $250 for the weekend for unlimited hogs.  The ranch is primarily a whitetail, axis, and turkey hunting ranch, and has seven box blinds and feeders.  It doesn’t have feeder lights, but you’re welcome to bring your own. They hunt the blinds in the mornings and evenings and stalks are allowed between those times.  It has a cleaning station with ropes and gambrels – you can clean your own hogs.

Lodging is a trailer that sleeps five, with a kitchen.  If we have more than five hunters the excess hunters will have to camp.  If that happens, we’ll look for camper volunteers.  If we don’t get any volunteers then we’ll use a computer number generator to determine who will camp.

The maximum number of hunters that we can bring is seven.  We have five deposits.  Two spots are open.

In the event that more than seven hunters want to go, the Rotation and the Event Hierarchy will apply and/or we’ll try to book a second weekend.

RSVP is required to Raul Pena at his email address or 210-364-0720.

A $50 deposit will be required immediately.

Contact Raul if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Mar
31

B. Hazy Eye Slabs

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Kevin McConnell recommends the B. Hazy Eye Slab (3/8 oz.) for jigging for white bass. Read More→

Categories : Products
Comments (0)

The following is a rotation list for self-chartered freshwater fishing trips on central Texas lakes within 90 miles of Austin.  We primarily target largemouth bass but can also go after crappie, white bass, and/or hybrids, so be prepared (for reel, line, and lure recommendations see the bottom of this page).

As I, Randy Rowley, have a full-time Monday – Friday job, am not a guide, fish on Saturday’s or state of Texas holidays (usually), and fish on highly pressured lakes, do not expect to always catch limits on these trips.  However, we usually have some success, including:

We will fish either Lakes Travis, Bastrop, Fayette, Decker, Stillhouse Hollow, Belton, Lady Bird, Austin, or a creek such as Yegua off of Somerville during the white bass run.  I can take up to two fishermen (three if they’re smaller) on my boat (not counting me).  Trips will usually be six to ten hours, counting travel time, unless the fish are biting well, in which case we may decide to fish later, or if they’re not biting well or at all, in which case we may decide to quit earlier.

We will fish out of my 20′ 3″ 2019 Excel Bay Pro 203 with a 115 HP Yahama motor, an 80 lb. thrust trolling motor, and two fish finders (unless we’re fishing a creek during the white bass run, in which case we’ll be on foot).  I usually will have at least one of these trips a month during non-hunting months (February through August), but will not guarantee a set number of times.

We will primarily fish with artificial lures.  I’m willing to fish part or all of the time with live or dead bait, but everyone in the boat must agree how we will fish before we leave as people who want to fish with lures will become frustrated if the boat isn’t moving often and people who want to fish with live bait will become frustrated if the boat is moving (as movement will drown the minnows).

Decker and Bastrop have 14 – 21″ slot limits, which allows you to keep up to five bass under 14″ or up to four bass under 14″ and one bass over 21″.  Anything between 14 – 21″ must be returned to the water.  The reason that the authorities have slot limits is those lakes are small and; therefore, can easily be depleted of bass.  Slot limits ensure that there will be a lot of 1 – 5 lb. bass for people to catch.  Fayette has a 14 – 24″ slot limit for the same reason.

Costs:

  • The participants (excluding me, if my boat is being used) will split the vehicle and boat gas (the amount depends on the distance traveled and the number of people sharing the gas), state or county park fees (if applicable), boat launch fees (if applicable), and toll road fees (if applicable).  I have to replace my boat’s batteries, trailer’s tires and bearings, etc., and repair things like my trolling motor more quickly due to taking Rotation members on such trips than I would if I didn’t take Rotation members and guests on such trips; therefore, I am exempt from the above expenses.
  • We’ll stop at Whataburger on the way to the lake and will probably stop for brunch on the way home.
  • Fishermen can use artificial lures and/or buy live and/or dead bait.

What to Bring:

  • Freshwater fishing license.
  • Rods and Reels (at least two in case you break one; I usually fish with eight).
  • Lures and/or terminal tackle for fishing with live and/or dead bait.
  • Headlamp/cap light (preferred) or flashlight (to help ready my boat for launch).
  • Cap/hat (optional).
  • Sunglasses (optional).
  • Sunscreen (optional).
  • Bug repellent (optional).
  • Drinks and snacks (optional; drinks are highly recommended).
  • A small ice chest or bag to take fish home in if we decide to keep them (I usually return largemouth bass to the water; there will be a large ice chest on my boat to put your drinks in and storage compartments to put your snacks in).
  • Rain gear, if rain is predicted.

I have five life jackets so you won’t need one.

I have extras of many of the items that are listed above and will happily loan things if you let me know that you would like to borrow something before we leave.  Of course, if you borrow something and break or lose it I will expect reimbursement.

Being on this rotation is a privilege and is not an FCS membership benefit.  This rotation is a service to FCS members and guests, but I will not tolerate the below actions.  I can and will remove a person from the rotation for any of the following reasons (this list is not all-inclusive):

  • Not fishing in a safe manner, including deliberately not following my instructions and the FCS Fishing Rules during a fishing trip.
  • Not paying your fair share of truck and boat gas and park entrance fees/boat launch fees.
  • Not paying for items (that are not yours) that you broke or lost (including losing lures that you borrowed).
  • Not helping during a fishing trip (including not helping get the boat back on the trailer).
  • Not talking quietly (fish can hear you and will get away from the sound).
  • Indicating that he or she will attend a fishing trip and then not showing up.
  • A pattern of being more than a few minutes late.
  • A pattern of canceling at the last minute.
  • Not returning my phone calls and/or emails.

The following people are on the Freshwater Fishing Trip Rotation for 2021 (as stated in How the Rotations Work, the Event Hierarchy applies):

  1. Randy Rowley (I always have Spot # 1, as I am the boat captain)
  2. Chris Rowley
  3. Roy Zengerle
  4. Kevin McConnell
  5. Earl Prochnick
  6. Harold Terry (Harold and Edward Terry prefer to go on fishing trips together)
  7. Edward Terry (Edward and Harold Terry prefer to go on fishing trips together)
  8. Zack and Yuri Tumlinson (Yuri will not go without Zack)
  9. Jonathan Fleming
  10. Burl and Daniel Fulenwider (Daniel will not go without Burl)
  11. Tim Cadena
  12. Mark Kelton
  13. Patrick Kelley
  14. Christian Bana
  15. Steve Fusco
  16. Steven Babin
  17. Jim McGee

Let me know at randywrowley@gmail.com (my preference) or at 512-922-2484 if you would like to be added to this rotation.  At present, any individual requesting to be added to the rotation will be placed at the bottom of the list.  Contact me if you have any questions.

Lure recommendations for Bass

Topwaters – walk-the-dog zigzag lures like River2Sea’s Rover, Lucky Craft’s Sammy and Gunfish, Heddon’s Zara Spook and Zara Spook Jr., Xcalibur’s Spittin’ Image, and Rapala’s Skitter V; poppers like Heddon’s Chugger Spook and Hula Popper, Storm’s Rattlin’ Chug Bug, and Rebel’s Pop-R; torpedo lures like River2Sea’s Whopper Plopper and Heddon’s Baby Torpedo; and Buzz baits like Booyah’s Buzz Clacker.  Colors – bass, shad, chartreuse, bone, and clear.  For lakes with a lot of grass (such as Bastrop, Decker, and Fayette) you can add frog-colored soft plastic frogs such as River2Sea’s Phat Mat Daddy, Bully Wa II, and Spittin’ Wa, Lunkerhunt’s Lunker Frog, Strike King’s KVD Sexy Frogs, American Baitworks’ Scum Frog Bigfoot, Scum Dog, and Scum Frog Popper, and toad style baits such as Stanley’s Ribbits.

Lipless crankbaits – Rapala’s Rippin’ Rap and Rattlin’ Rapala, Xcalibur’s Xr75 or Xr50, Strike King’s Red Eye Shad, 6th Sense’s Quake 70, 80, and THUD and Snatch 70X, Berkley’s Warpig, BOOYAH’s One Knocker, Yo-Zuri’s Rattl’n Vibe and 3DB Vibe, and Bill Lewis’s Rat-L-Trap.  Colors – bass, shad, perch, red (best in spring), and chartreuse (best in the summer).

Crankbaits – Norman’s Deep Little N and Little N, Strike King’s Pro-Model 3XD and 3XD, Rapala’s DT-10, DT-8, DT-6, Scatter Rap, and Shad Rap, 6th Sense’s Crush 250 MD, Curve 55, and Cloud 9 C6 and C10, Bomber’s Flat A, 5A, and 6A, Bandit’s 100, 200 and 300 Series, and Storm’s Wiggle Wart.  Use the same colors as the lipless crankbaits.

Deep diving crankbaits – Norman’s DD-22, Bomber’s Deep Fat Free Shad and Fat Free Shad, Strike King’s 5XD, 6XD, 8XD, and 10XD, and 6th Sense’s Cloud 9 C15, C20, and C25 and Crush 300DD and 500DD.  Use the same colors as the lipless crankbaits.

Square bill crankbaits – River2Sea’s Biggy Poppa, Strike King’s KVD 2.5, Rapala’s Crankin’ Rap 03, Storm’s Arashi, Spro’s Little John, Zoom’s W.E.C. E-1, E-2 and E-3, Luck-E-Strike’s Rick Clunn RC2, 6th Sense’s Fishing Crush 50X and Cloud 9 Magnum Squarebill, Yo-Zuri’s 3DB, BOOYAH’s XCS Series, and Rebel’s Bluegill.  Use the same colors as the lipless crankbaits.

Jerk baits (stick baits) – Bomber’s Long A, Rapala’s Husky Jerk and X-Rap, Smithwick’s Rattlin’ Rogue, and Storm’s Thunderstick.  Same colors as the crankbaits.

Spinnerbaits/chatterbaits (bladed jigs) – white, yellow, chartreuse, combo white/yellow or white/chartreuse, watermelon (green), red (in the spring), and black/blue or black/red when it’s dark or there is a heavy overcast.  I prefer spinnerbaits with two blades over one.  The type is not that important but I tend to prefer the Colorado blade, as they dive deeper.  Spinnerbait brands include River2Sea, Nichols, Strike King, BOOYAH, Terminator, and War Eagle.  Chatterbait brands include Z-man, Strike King, BOOYAH, and Terminator.  Spinnerbaits on steroids include Umbrella/Alabama rigs.

Slabs/spoons – 1/2 – 1 1/2 ounce in white, silver, chartreuse, or combos of those colors.  These are particularly good for white bass, hybrids, stripers, and largemouth bass along steep rocky ledges.

Soft plastics (usually will only attract largemouth bass – not whites, hybrids, or stripers) – Zoom’s finesse worms, flukes, crawdads, lizards, or baby brush hogs, Berkley’s power worms, crawdads, or lizards, Gary Yamamoto’s Senko and Swimming Senko worms, Yum Dinger’s worms, Big Bite worms and grubs, Grandebass’s rattlesnakes, and Blakemore’s Road Runner with grub tails.  Colors depend on the time of year and such things as if it’s overcast or sunny.  The general rule is darker colors work best when it’s overcast and during the winter.  Lighter colors work best in the fall, spring, and summer and when it’s sunny.  Some of my favorite colors include Smokin’ Green, Watermelon, Watermelon Red, June Bug, Red Bug, Red Shad, Motor Oil, Pumpkinseed, Dark Blue, and Camo.  Zoom’s Baby Brushhog in pumpkinseed is a good choice for Travis in the fall.  Lizards and crawdads in pumpkinseed are good in the spring.  Soft swimbaits are good in the grass.

Lure Recommendations for Crappie (also good for white bass)

Crappie jigs (1/16, 1/8, or 1/4 ounce and crappie grubs such as the Bobby Garland Mo’Glo (glow-in-the-dark) 2″ Baby Shad or Hyper Grub in Ghost Sparkle or Ghastly Minnow).

Spinners – Blakemore’s Road Runner (the grub version is preferred, 1/8 ounce in white, yellow, or chartreuse), Johnson’s Beetle Spin (1/8 or 1/4 ounce in white, yellow, or chartreuse), or inline spinners such as Mepp’s Aglia Ultra Lite spinner (1/18 ounce with a gold blade and yellow wool).

Line Recommendations for Bass Reels

Baitcasting reels

For topwater baitcasting reels use mono in 12 – 15 lb. test.  The exception is fishing with soft plastic frogs, in which case 50 – 65 lb. braid is the best (to cut through weeds, lily pads, etc.; braid also floats).

For crankbait/spinnerbait/chatterbait/jerk bait baitcasting reels use fluorocarbon in 12 – 15 lb. test.

For soft plastics, reels use fluorocarbon in 12 – 15 lb. test or braid in 30 – 50 lb. test (braid does not have the same thickness as fluorocarbon or mono – 40 lb. braid = 12 lb. fluorocarbon or mono).

Spinning reels

Spinning reels shine using light lures, which most baitcasting reels have trouble with.  Therefore, I recommend 8 – 10 lb. fluorocarbon or lighter.

Spincast reels

These are the least desirable reels for bass reels.  Most are cheaply made and will not last long if used regularly.  Generally, for most spincast reels you don’t want to use anything heavier than 10 lb. mono.

Line and Reel Recommendations for Crappie (and white bass) Reels

Spinning reels (preferred)

Use fluorocarbon or mono in 2 – 8 lb. test, the lighter the better.

Spincast reels (ultralights)

Use mono in 2 – 8 lb. test, the lighter the better.

Baitcasting reels

Don’t use.  They won’t be able to cast the light lines and lures that are required for crappie fishing.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Mar
24

Rotations (Hunting and Fishing)

Posted by: | Comments (0)

How the Rotations Work

Rotations:

Categories : Rotations
Comments (0)

Our annual Chartered Striped/Hybrid/White Bass Fishing Trip is set for Monday afternoon, 5/3/21, with guide Fermin Fernandez of Trophy Stripers on Lake Buchanan.  Check his website for info and photo galleries.

Sixteen participants fished with Fermin and two other guides on 5/6/19 and had a good day.  We caught several species of fish.  Keepers included 59 white bass, five stripers, six catfish, and a crappie.  Jim McGee caught the largest striper – a 24 incher.

Striped bass grow larger than hybrid striped bass.  For both species, the minimum length is 18″ and the limit is five.  If you catch white bass the minimum limit is 10” and the daily bag limit is 25.

Depending on the size of our group they may split us up between multiple boats and the cost, if we have four to five on a boat, is $120 per person.  The guide(s) will supply the boat, rods, bait, landing nets, and a fish box.  They’ll clean the fish and bag them.  The price does not include shared gas, eating out on the way home, and an optional but highly recommended tip.  A 15% tip would be $18 and a 20% tip would be $24.

RSVP is required to Daryl Shipper at shipperdog@gmail.com or 512-638-6971.

A $50 deposit per person is required to hold your spot.  After your spot is confirmed, mail your deposit check, payable to Fermin Fernandez, to:

Daryl Shipper

200 Lost Mesa

Belton, Texas 76513

Contact Daryl if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

Our next Self-Chartered Bay Fishing Trip will be to Port O’Connor on 4/16/21 – 4/18/21.  We presently have three boats committed and can take nine fishermen, in addition to the three captains.  The Self-chartered Bay Fishing Trip Rotation and the Event Hierarchy apply.  We will select participants based on their position within the Rotation; however, if they don’t have an active FCS membership they will be at the bottom of the list.

We will use Wayne Weilnau’s house as well as a suite at The Inn at Clark’s (a waterfront inn on the Intercoastal).  The lodging cost will be approximately $80/per person for the weekend (we’ll divide the lodging and house cleaning fee evenly), which includes the extra boat slip fee.  Additional costs will be for shared truck and boat gas (minus the captains), restaurant and drive-through food, and bait.  Due to the recent freeze and normal seasonal bait availability, we anticipate fishing primarily with artificials or dead/frozen bait.

There has been a lot of mixed messaging about the impacts of the recent freeze on fish populations.  Wayne came down shortly after the freeze and saw some dead fish but not large numbers.  Wayne and his son fished the afternoon of 3/16/21 and caught two legal reds and three trout.  Zach and Yuri Tumlinson fished with some guides on 3/13/21 and reported success on black drum, reds, and trout.  Daryl and Leanne Shipper caught five slot reds, one over-the-slot read, and a sheepshead on 2/28/21 (a personal best).  Although fish populations seem good at this time, we should still practice conservation by only keeping what we will eat in the near future as well as releasing the larger fish that will serve as brood fish.

This trip is full. The following people have the spots:

  1. Randy Rowley
  2. Daryl Shipper
  3. Wayne Weilnau
  4. Chris Rowley
  5. Jim McGee
  6. Harold Terry
  7. Edward Terry (son)
  8. Roy Zengerle
  9. Binh Chu
  10. Harley Chu (son)
  11. Blake Lieb
  12. Burl Fulenwider
  13. Zack Tumlinson  (alternate)
  14. Yuri Tumlinson (alternate)
  15. Steven Babin (alternate)

If you are interested in being added to the ‘will-call list’ (in case someone drops out), contact Wayne at txfalcon59@gmail.com or at 512-589-4120. 

A $50 deposit is due to Wayne before the end of March.

Contact Wayne if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

The following is a rotation list for Self-chartered Bay Fishing Trips (only) at POC and Self-guided/chartered Blasts and Casts (Duck Hunts and Bay Fishing Trips) at Port O’Connor (POC) and Corpus Christi.

We’ve had many successful duck hunting and fishing trips but our boat captains are not guides and two of them have full-time jobs and only hunt and/or fish on weekends, so do not expect to always shoot and/or catch limits on these trips.

We’ve had many successful duck hunts at both locales and have often gotten our two-duck limit of redheads.  We’ve killed a few other ducks but redheads are the predominant species on the coast.  We’ve generally not been as successful fishing in the winter as we are the warmer months.

We primarily target redfish, black drum, and speckled trout but can also catch sheepshead, flounder, jack crevelle, sharks, rays, and a variety of non-game fish such as hardheads and lady fish, so be prepared.  For lure and line recommendations see the bottom of this page.

Here are pictures of some of our successes.

Boats can include Wayne Weilnau’s, Daryl Shipper’s, and Randy Rowley’s bay boats, and possibly others.  Wayne, Daryl, and Randy can take three hunters or fishermen on their boats in addition to them.  For duck hunting, the boats are used to ferry the hunters to the hunting spots and then beached or anchored about 100 yards away.  We fish from the boats.

Costs:

  • The participants (excluding the captain) will split the vehicle and boat gas (the amount depends on the distance traveled and the number of people sharing the gas), a boat wash after the event (to wash the salt and mud off, state or county park fees (if applicable), boat slip fees (if applicable), boat launch fees (if applicable), and toll road fees (if applicable).  The captains have to replace their boat batteries, tires, etc., and repair things like their trolling motors more quickly due to going on such trips than they would if they did not take members and guests on such trips; therefore, they are exempt from the above expenses.
  • We’ll eat out or get drive-through food.
  • For Corpus Christi, we’ll stay in an Airbnb house or townhouse.  For Port O’Conner, once Covid has been cleared and renovations have been made, Wayne will allow participants to stay at his home.  If that’s not possible, we’ll stay at The Inn at Clark’s (a waterfront inn on the Intercoastal).
  • Fishermen can use artificial lures and/or buy live and/or dead bait.

What to Bring (if duck hunting)

  • Hunting license, state migratory bird stamp, federal duck stamp, and saltwater fishing license.  If you bought a super combo license it includes your hunting license, migratory bird endorsement, and saltwater fishing license but does not include a federal duck stamp.
  • Shotgun.  A 12 gauge piston operated semi-automatic with a 3-inch chamber is recommended.  A plug is required for semi-automatics and pumps capable of holding more than two shells in the magazine while hunting migratory game birds.
  • Camo or dull non-cloth shotgun case.  Cloth cases during waterfowl hunts tend to get muddy.  We’ll leave the cases in the bed of the guide’s truck.  If we’re hunting from a boat a floating case is recommended.
  • Non-lead shotgun shells (HEVI-Steel, Winchester Xpert, or equivalent in 2 shot – the 1550 FPS variant) chambered for 3-inch chambers (if your gun is also chambered for 3 inches) are recommended.   Randy Rowley does not recommend anything smaller than 4 shot.  10 gauges and 3 1/2 inch shells in 3 1/2 inch chambered 12 gauges are overkill for ducks, in his opinion.  Steel shot (if of adequate size) will kill ducks – there is no need for Hevi-shot, Tungsten, Bismuth, etc.  You’ll pay a lot more for those shells and they aren’t needed.  You’ll not need more than three boxes and will probably shoot less than two boxes.
  • Camo or dull blind bag, shell bag, vest, or bandoleer.  If your shell bag is bright (e.g., a red HEB shopping bag) you’ll need to hide it well.  A floating blind bag is recommended.
  • Headlamp or cap light.
  • Camo outer hunting clothes, including cap/hat and a face mask or face paint (face coverings are absolutely essential as oily skin glows in a duck’s eyes).  You never know when it will rain on the coast, so bring rain gear.
  • Waders (absolutely essential).  Breathable waders are recommended for warmer hunts.  Neoprene waders are recommended for colder hunts (if you wear 5mm thick neoprene waders on a December hunt you might cook yourself).  We don’t put our waders on until we reach the boat ramp.
  • Bucket, stool, or folding chair.  We’ll hunt from natural cover, so you can sit on the ground, but you won’t be able to see the ducks as easily.
  • Three gallon-sized Zip-Lok bags, as to be legal, you’ll need to have your ducks in separate bags for separate days.
  • A medium-sized ice chest or bag to take your ducks home in (if you get any).
  • Drinks and snacks (optional; drinks are highly recommended).  There are storage compartments in all three boats to put your drinks and snacks in.
  • Non-mirrored sunglasses (optional).
  • Bug repellent (optional).

What to Bring (if bay fishing)

  • Rods and Reels (at least two in case you break one; no more than four).
  • Lures and/or terminal tackle for live and/or dead bait.
  • Headlamp or cap light.
  • Clothing appropriate for the season.  You never know when it will rain on the coast, so bring rain gear.
  • Three gallon-sized Zip-Lok bags, as to be legal, you’ll need to have your fish in separate bags for separate days.
  • A medium-sized ice chest or bag to take your fish home in (if you get any).  If on a blast and cast you won’t need a medium sized ice chest for your ducks and a medium-sized ice chest for your fish – one will do.
  • Drinks and snacks (optional; drinks are highly recommended).  There are storage compartments in all three boats to put your drinks and snacks in.
  • Sunglasses (optional).
  • Bug repellent (optional).
  • Sunscreen (optional).

Randy has extras of many of the items that are listed above (e.g., waders, floating gun cases, stools, small ice chests, cap lights, etc.) and will happily loan them if you let him know before we leave.  Of course, if you borrow something and break or lose it he will expect reimbursement.

For ducks, Randy usually starts out with a modified choke.  If the ducks are coming into the dekes, he’ll switch to an improved cylinder.  If the ducks are only offering long pass shots he’ll switch to full.  Most modern screw-in chokes are designed for lead and non-lead shot without a change in the pattern density.

Here is what sitting in the typical cover looks like:

1/10/14 - Coastal Duck Hunt - Binh Chu & Son Harley

Or, if we find a blind that someone isn’t using, we can try to hunt it.  Here’s what one looks like:

Randy has 101 decoys that he can bring to the coast if three boats are going (38 mallards (counting two quiver ducks, a motorized duck, and a wind-activated duck that he only uses when it’s windy enough to spin the wings and when it’s too windy to use the motorized duck), 20 redheads, 16 pintails, 14 gadwalls, six canvasbacks, six buffleheads, and a widgeon.  If two boats are going he’ll probably only bring 76 decoys.  In addition, Wayne and Daryl have decoys that they might bring.  Combined decoys can be over 124 if all three men go on a trip.

Being on this rotation is a privilege and is not an FCS membership benefit.  This rotation is a service to FCS members and guests, but I will not tolerate the below actions.  I can and will remove a person from the rotation for any of the following reasons (this list is not all-inclusive):

  • Not hunting or fishing in a safe manner, including deliberately not following the captain’s instructions and the FCS Safety and Shooting rules, Hunting and Fishing Rules, and Game Law Clarifications during a blast and cast or bay fishing trip.
  • Not paying for your share of the gas or fixing or replacing items (that are not yours) that you broke (including decoys that you shot and sank).
  • Not helping during a blast and cast or bay fishing trip (including not helping get the boats back on the trailers).
  • Not controlling your dog during a hunt (a dog that wants to go play with the decoys or charge the ducks as they’re coming in will ruin the hunt for everyone).
  • Not talking quietly, especially when ducks are coming into the decoys (ducks can hear you and will veer away).  Fish can hear you also.
  • Indicating that you will attend a blast and cast or bay fishing trip and then not showing up.
  • A pattern of being more than a few minutes late.
  • A pattern of canceling at the last minute.
  • Not returning the event coordinator’s/leader’s phone calls and/or emails.

The following people are on the Self-guided/chartered Blast and Cast (duck hunt and bay fishing trip) and bay fishing trip Rotation for 2021 (as stated in How the Rotations Work, the Event Hierarchy applies; Randy Rowley, Daryl Shipper, and Wayne Weilnau will always have Spot #’s 1 – 3, as they are the boat captains):

  1. Randy Rowley
  2. Daryl Shipper
  3. Wayne Weilnau
  4. Chris Rowley (Chris and Ryan Rowley prefer to go on trips together)
  5. Ryan Rowley (Ryan and Chris Rowley prefer to go on trips together)
  6. Steve Fusco
  7. Raul Pena
  8. Ken Miller
  9. Jim McGee
  10. Harold Terry (Harold and Edward Terry prefer to go on trips together)
  11. Edward Terry (Edward and Harold Terry prefer to go on trips together)
  12. Steve Ritter
  13. Roy Zengerle
  14. Zack Elmer
  15. Mark Kelton
  16. Mike Pozhenko and his minor son
  17. Binh Chu and his minor son
  18. Ted Lieb (Ted, Blake, and Isaac Lieb prefer to go on trips together)
  19. Blake Lieb (Blake, Ted, and Isaac Lieb prefer to go on trips together)
  20. Isaac Lieb (Isaac, Ted, and Blake Lieb prefer to go on trips together)
  21. Jonathan Fleming
  22. Burl Fulenwider
  23. Zack and Yuri Tumlinson (Yuri will not go without Zack)
  24. Patrick Kelley (bay fishing only)
  25. Christian Bana (bay fishing only)
  26. Steven Babin (bay fishing only)

Let Randy know at randywrowley@gmail.com (his preference) or 512-922-2484 if you would like to be added to this rotation.  Individuals added after 9/17/20 will be added to the bottom of the rotation.  Let Randy know if you have any questions.

Lure recommendations

Soft plastics – Egret Baits’s VuDu Shrimp and VuDu Vixen, Z-Man’s EZ Shrimpz, scented Jerk Shad, Paddler, and Pogy, Berkley’s Gulp Alive Shrimp, Ghost Shrimp, Shrimp, Swimming Mullet, Pogy, Ripple Mullets, Mud Minnow/coakers, and Saltwater Jerk Shad, Zoom’s Salty Super Fluke, Norton Lures’s Sand Shad, Sand Eel, and Bull Minnow, and Bass Assassin’s BANG Die Dapper, Sea Shad, Saltwater Shad Assassin, and Saltwater Curly Tail Shad.  Popular colors include salt and pepper (Bass Assassin calls it the Birthday Suit), red/white, and Bass Assassin’s Chicken on a Chain (light green and white with black specks and a chartreuse tail).  Jig heads include H&H Lure Double-Eye, Pro Shad, Rattilize, Arrow Head, and Cocahoe, Strike King Trokar, Bass Assassin, and Z-Man Redfish Eye and Trout Eye.  1/8, 3/16, 1/4, or 3/8 oz.  Red, white, or lead.

Spoons – Johnson Silver Minnow and Gold Minnow, H&H Lure Secret Weedless Redfish Spoon, Strike King Sexy Spoon, and Nichols Lures Mojo Flutter Spoon.  1/2 – 1 ounce in gold or silver.  These are particularly good for redfish and speckled trout.

Topwaters – walk the dog lures like Bomber’s Badonk-A-Donk, Heddon’s Zara Spook, Zara Spook Jr., and Chug’n Spook Jr., Rapala’s Saltwater Skitter Walk and Skitter V, MirrOlure’s Series III, Pro Dog Jr., or Top Dog Jr., and Yo-Zuri 3DB Topwater Pencil and 3-D Inshore Pencil; poppers like MirrOlure’s C-Eye Poppa Mullet Surface Popper and Heddon’s Chuggar Spook; and torpedo lures like River2Sea’s Whopper Plopper.  The last two lures don’t come with saltwater hooks, so be sure to rinse the hooks with freshwater after use in saltwater.  1/2 – 1 ounce.

Lipless crankbaits/twitch baits – Bill Lewis’s Magnum Force, Mag-Trap, Knock-L-Trap, and Rat-L-Trap, MirrOlure’s MirrODine, MirrODine XL, Paul Brown’s Fat Boy, MirrOMinnow, MirrOMullett, Series III Catch 2000, 52 MR, She Dog, She Pup, Glad Shad, and XXL, and Rapala’s X-Rap Twitchin’ Minnow and Twitchin’ Mullet.  1/2 – 1 ounce.

Crankbaits – Bill Lewis’s Echo and MirrOlure’s MirrOLip 1/2 oz Suspending Crankbait.  1/2 – 1 ounce.

Jerk baits/Swim baits – Yo-Zuri’s Pin’s Minnow Floating Swim Bait, Crystal 3-D Minnow, Crystal Minnow, 3DS 2-3/4″ Suspending Minnow, Mag Minnow, and 3-D Inshore, Bomber’s Jointed Long A, Saltwater Grade Heavy Duty Long A, and Magnum Long A, and Cotton Cordell’s Red-Fin.  1/2 – 1 ounce.

Hard bait lure colors – white with red heads, silver with red heads, silver with black backs, silver with blue backs, silver with pink backs, gold with pink backs, bone, and chartreuse.

Line Recommendations for baitcasting and spinning reels

For topwater lures use mono in 12 – 15 lb. test.

For diving lures use fluorocarbon in 12 – 15 lb. test.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Mar
20

5/15/21 FCS Sporting Clays Shoot

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Our next FCS Bi-monthly Sporting Clays Shoot will be on Saturday, 5/15/21, from 9:00 – 11:30 AM at Capital City Clays.  We’ll shoot one round of 50 sporting clays.  We’ll probably shoot their red course (formerly called the corporate or hunter course).

Note that the following restrictions are still in place by Capital City Clays:

  • Masks are required.
  • Groups cannot exceed four people.  (However, we usually didn’t have groups larger than that in the past.)
  • Proper distancing is required.  Do not “pile-up” at a station.  If the group in front of you is not done shooting, please wait several yards away until they move on.
  • They’re putting out bottled water only at some stations.

Their clubhouse is now open.  Their bathrooms remain open.

You can shoot singles, report pairs, or true pairs.  Or you can follow the menu at each station which is a mix of true pairs and report pairs.  We keep score just for fun and keep a history log on the FCS website (now under Events) so you can see how you have improved over time.

  • 9:00 AM – Sporting clays
  • 11:00 AM – Scores and announcements
  • 11:30 AM – Depart

Who should come: Members and guests, including ladies and youth, both new shooters and experienced.  We usually have around 10 participants, and we break up into groups.  We recommend all shooters be at least 10 years old.  For youths, we suggest a 20 gauge that fits the child (if a youth shoots a .410 he or she will probably miss a lot and may get discouraged).  We often have new shooters and delight in teaching others what we have learned.

Cost and what to bring:

  • Each 50 round course costs $23.81/person (includes tax).
  • You’ll need a shotgun (of course).  Most of us shoot a 12 gauge, but a 20 gauge is good also.  Most of the targets on the Capital City Clays Red course are close enough for skeet chokes, but IC works fine.  If you don’t have a shotgun some of us will be happy to share our gun with you, but let Randy Rowley know before you arrive.
  • You’ll also need to bring at least two boxes of shells.  A few extra shells are recommended in case you have any misfires or need to reshoot a station because a second clay broke in flight before you had a chance to shoot it (in such cases we shoot both targets again).  Capital City Clays sells shotgun shells if you need them (but you can get them cheaper at Academy, Walmart, etc.).  Randy Rowley recommends Winchester Game Loads / Federal Game and Target Loads / Estate Dove Loads / Rio Game Loads / Remington Sure Shot Heavy Dove Loads / Estate Dove and Target Loads.  All of which are sometimes available at Academy.  1 oz or 1-1/8 oz loads and 1250-1300 FPS and 7-1/2 or 8 shot work well.  They all sell for $5.50 – $7.00/box.  All six are great dove/quail loads in addition to being good clay target loads.  If you’re a dove/quail hunter, Randy recommends that you shoot sporting clays with the same load that you use to hunt dove/quail.  This enables you to develop consistent leads for similarly sized targets.
  • Capital City Clays requires eye and ear protection.  You can bring your own or it is available free of charge at Capital City Clays.

Location and phone number: 8707 Lindell Lane (near the Travis County Exposition Center and Lake Decker), 512-272-4707

In the event of rain: Light rain – we shoot; heavy rain – we stay home and Bruce Crockett will send out a cancellation notice.

Questions:  Contact Bruce at bmc55@att.net or 512-970-7797.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

FCS will participate in the next Capital City Clays sporting clays tournament on Saturday, 5/8/21.  There is an online registration form (pre-registration is requested, not required).  The main event (100 targets) price is $70.  We can have groups of up to five but must have at least three (not all have to be FCS members).  There will also be a 50 Target 5-Stand Event, 50 Target Side Event, and Concurrent options.  We may have time to shoot a practice round of skeet.

If you are not a National Association (NSCA) member, you will shoot Hunter (or Shooter) Class, which means you will not be eligible to win the prize money, and your score will not be posted on their website.  Membership with the NSCA is $40 per year.

Capital City Clays is located at 8707 Lindell Lane.  Their phone number is 512-272-4707.

Contact Bruce Crockett at bmc55@att.net or 512-970-7797 if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

The following is a rotation list for self-guided inland duck hunts on central Texas lakes or a pond, within 110 miles of Austin.

Do not expect limits on these hunts, as I, Randy Rowley, have a full-time job, am not a guide, hunt on Saturdays (usually), and hunt on highly pressured lakes in an area of Texas that is not known for great duck hunting.  Our results have usually been far from it.  Here is our scorecard to date:

Season Number of Ducks Bagged Number of Hunts Number of Hunters Average Number of Ducks Per Hunt Average Number of Ducks Per Hunter
2020/2021 1 5 20 0.20 0.05
2019/2020 50 (44 on a pond) 11 39 4.55 1.28
2018/2019 5 (5 on a pond) 6 24 0.83 0.21
2017/2018 8 6 18 1.33 0.44
2016/2017 0 4 24 0.00 0.00
2015/2016 9 5 15 1.80 0.60
2014/2015 10 (6 on a pond) 7 28 1.43 0.36
2013/2014 11 (2 on a pond) 6 18 1.83 0.61
2012/2013 16 6 18 2.67 0.89
2011/2012 16 5 17 3.20 0.94
Total 126 (69 on lakes and 57 on ponds) 60 209 2.10 0.60

Some of our successes include:

I can take up to three adult hunters (four including me) on my 2019 20-foot 3-inch camo Excel Bay Pro 203 with a 115 HP Yahama motor, which has a camo blind that sits on top of it (see below).

We will hunt either Lakes GrangerStillhouse HollowBeltonSomerville, or Waco in their Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) or a local pond.

All five lakes are administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).  We will hunt until 8:30 – 10:30 AM, depending on how the ducks are flying and the weather conditions (ducks often fly longer when it is overcast).

We will not hunt Lake Georgetown.  The USACE requires a Small Game Permit to hunt waterfowl.  The Lake Georgetown Project Office will only issue 50 small game permits each season.  Small game permits will be administered through an application and a random drawing process and there is a $25 application fee.  See https://www.swf-wc.usace.army.mil/georgetown/Recreation/Hunting.asp.

Granger does not require a USACE lake hunting permit.  However, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) leases Granger’s WMA’s; consequently, a TPWD annual public hunting permit is required.  The cost is $48/year.  If we decide to hunt Granger we will hunt in the San Gabriel, Willis Creek, or Sore Finger WMA’s.  Taylor Park in Granger is 41 miles from my house and Friendship Park is 47.

Stillhouse, Belton, and Waco do not require a TPWD annual Public hunting permit nor a USACE lake hunting permit (see http://www.swf-wc.usace.army.mil/stillhouse/Recreation/Hunting.asp).

If we decide to hunt Stillhouse we’ll launch at Riversbend Park (51 miles from my house) and hunt in the Union Grove WMA on the island (the side depends on the direction of the wind) or in a small cove.  Or we’ll launch at Cedar Gap Park and hunt in the Gravel Crossing or Twin Creek WMA’s, up the Lampasas River.

If we decide to hunt Belton, we will hunt either the Owl Creek, White Flint, or Iron Bridge WMA’s.   Leona Park is 69 miles from my house, so we’ll have to leave 30 minutes earlier than we would if we were going to hunt Granger or Stillhouse.  As we’ve yet to bag a duck on Belton, it’s our last choice.

If we decide to hunt Waco we will hunt either in the Flat Rock hunting area or in the Hog Creek or Middle Bosque hunting areas.  Depending on where we hunt, Waco is 58 – 65 miles further than Granger (99 – 106 miles from my house), so we’ll have to leave an hour earlier than we would if we were going to hunt Granger.  Note that all hunters who hunt on Lake Waco must sign a Disclaimer and Waiver of Liability and have it in their possession while hunting.  Also, duck hunters on Lake Waco must wear at least 400 square inches of hunter orange material (144 square inches on both chest and back) and some type of orange headwear when leaving their hunting destinations.  In addition, no hunting is permitted around Waco Wetlands.

Somerville does not require a USACE lake hunting permit.  You’ll need a TPWD annual public hunting permit if we hunt in the TPWD day hunt area (the undeveloped area designated by the yellow line on the below map).  We must hunt from my boat, be far enough from the shoreline that our shot will not fall on dry land, and must not set up so that we’re shooting in the direction of the shoreline.  If we hunt in the “developed” area of Nails Creek Park (the area designated by the orange line on the below map) we must hunt from my boat at least 200 yards from shore.  We cannot hunt in the area designated by the red line on the below map.  The USACE day hunt area does not require a TPWD annual public hunting permit, although we can only hunt from the shore in that area (we can’t hunt from my boat), so it’s my last choice.  Somerville is 54 miles further than Granger (95 miles from my house), so we’ll have to leave an hour earlier than we would if we were going to hunt Granger.

We also might hunt a pond just east of Austin.  If so, there is a $20/hunter charge and we won’t be using my boat.  We’ll walk a short distance and hunt behind a blind or camo netting or use natural cover.  If we hunt the pond we can take up to five hunters, counting Chris Campbell, the host.

The pond

The outside of the blind

The inside of the blind

The view from the inside of the blind

NOTE: Do not attempt to arrange a hunt with Chris on your own.  To be fair to everyone the pond hunts need to go through me.  If I decide that it won’t over-pressure the ponds, I will first contact Chris.  If he is agreeable to it, I’ll let everyone on the rotation know so the other people on the rotation will have an opportunity to go.  If guys are trying to arrange their own hunts it is bypassing the other guys on the rotation and that’s not fair to them.  It would also contribute to over-pressuring the pond.  If we over-pressure it then it will ultimately result in poor future hunts, as ducks will start to shun the pond.  That’s why good guides have a half dozen or more ponds that they rotate their hunters among.  I have asked Chris to refer any requests to hunt the pond from guys on the FCS Duck Hunt Rotation to me.

In addition, Chris is concerned about guys letting their friends know about the pond and then them starting to contact his grandfather directly.  If you have friends who might want to hunt have them contact me and I’ll add them to the rotation.  If we have people start knocking on his grandfather’s door asking to hunt it will shut the door on this pond and ruin it for everyone.

Not complying with either of the above will result in removal from the rotation.

Where we hunt will depend on hunting reports that I received from various sources and lake levels.

Costs:

  • The participants (excluding me, if my boat is being used) will split the vehicle and boat gas (the amount depends on the distance traveled and the number of people sharing the gas), boat launch fees (if applicable; no more than $5 each), and toll road fees (if we take any).  I have to replace my boat’s starter battery, tires, etc. more quickly due to going on such trips than I would if I didn’t take members and guests on such trips; therefore, I am exempt from the above expenses.
  • If we’re not using my boat then I’ll join in with the other participants on splitting the vehicle gas and toll road feeds (if we take any).
  • If we hunt the pond east of Austin, there is a $20/hunter charge.
  • We’ll stop at Whataburger on the way to the lake/pond and will probably stop for second breakfast or brunch on the way home.

What to Bring:

  • Hunting license, state migratory bird stamp, and federal duck stamp.  If you bought a super combo license it includes your hunting license and migratory bird endorsement but does not include a federal duck stamp.
  • Shotgun.  A 12 gauge piston operated semi-automatic with a 3-inch chamber is recommended.  A plug is required for semi-automatics and pumps capable of holding more than two shells in the magazine while hunting migratory game birds.
  • Camo or dull non-cloth shotgun case.  If we’re hunting from a boat a floating case is recommended.  Cloth cases during duck hunts at ponds tend to get muddy, so I recommend that they be left in the vehicles.
  • Non-lead shotgun shells (HEVI-Steel, Winchester Xpert, or equivalent in 2 shot – the 1550 FPS variant) chambered for 3-inch chambers (if your gun is also chambered for 3 inches) are recommended.   Randy Rowley does not recommend anything smaller than 4 shot.  10 gauges and 3 1/2 inch shells in 3 1/2 inch chambered 12 gauges are overkill for ducks, in his opinion.  Steel shot (if of adequate size) will kill ducks – there is no need for Hevi-shot, Tungsten, Bismuth, etc.  You’ll pay a lot more for those shells and they aren’t needed.  You’ll not need more than three boxes and will probably shoot less than two boxes.
  • Camo or dull blind bag, shell bag, vest, or bandoleer.  If we’re hunting from my boat a floating blind bag is recommended.  If your shell bag is bright (e.g., a red HEB shopping bag) you’ll need to hide it well during duck hunts at ponds.
  • Headlamp or cap light.
  • Camo outer hunting clothes, including cap/hat and a face mask or face paint (face coverings are absolutely essential as oily skin glows in a duck’s eyes).  If rain is predicted, bring rain gear.
  • Waders (absolutely essential except on the pond hunts).  Breathable waders are recommended for warmer hunts.  Neoprene waders are recommended for colder hunts (if you wear 5mm thick neoprene waders on a November or December hunt you might cook yourself).  We don’t put our waders on until we reach the pond, lake, or river (the exception is if you have breathable waders and it’s a cold morning).  If we’re hunting a pond bring boots that you don’t mind getting muddy, but waders will not be required.
  • Bucket, stool, or folding chair for pond hunts.  We’ll hunt from behind a mesh blind, so you won’t be able to see if you sit on the ground.  If we hunt from my boat you’ll not need a bucket, stool, or chair, as my boat has fishing chairs and benches.  However, if we have to hunt from shore (because the cover is too far from shore and my boat will stick out like a sore thumb) we’ll use my boat to ferry us to where we’ll hunt, park it 100 or so yards away, and sit in the cover.  In which case you’ll need a bucket, stool, or chair.
  • Drinks and snacks (optional; drinks are highly recommended).  There are storage compartments in my boat to put your drinks and snacks in.
  • Non-mirrored sunglasses (optional).
  • Bug repellent (optional) for hunts during the early part of the season.
  • A small ice chest or bag to take your ducks home in (if you get any).

I have five life jackets so you won’t need one.

I have extras of many of the items that are listed above (such as waders, floating gun cases, cap lights, etc.) and will happily loan things if you let me know that you would like to borrow something before we leave.  Of course, if you borrow something and break or lose it I will expect reimbursement.

Here is an example of sitting in cover:

I usually start out with a modified choke.  If the ducks are coming into the dekes, I might switch to an improved cylinder choke.  If all we’re getting is shots as they fly past, I might switch to a full choke.  Most modern screw-in chokes are designed for lead and non-lead shot without a change in the pattern density.

I have 126 decoys (50 mallards (counting 12 on 12′ lines, two quiver ducks, a motorized duck, and a wind-activated duck that I only use when it’s windy enough to spin the wings and when it’s too windy to use the motorized duck), 20 redheads, 16 pintails, 14 gadwalls, 13 teal, six canvasbacks, six buffleheads, and a widgeon.  In addition, FCS has 33 decoys (25 teal and 8 wood ducks) in its inventory.  Combining my decoys and the FCS decoys I have 159 decoys.  However, I’ll only bring decoys for the types of ducks found on the lake that we’re going to.  For example, I’ve never seen canvasbacks or buffleheads on Somerville, Granger, or Belton, so those will stay in my garage when we go there.  I also won’t bring the decoys on 12′ lines for shallow lakes.  I usually bring five dozen decoys on the big lakes.

Being on this rotation is a privilege and is not an FCS membership benefit.  This rotation is a service to FCS members and guests, but I will not tolerate the below actions.  I can and will remove a person from the rotation for any of the following reasons (this list is not all-inclusive):

  • Not hunting in a safe manner, including deliberately not following my instructions and the FCS Safety and Shooting rules, Hunting and Fishing Rules, and Game Law Clarifications during a hunt.
  • Not paying for your share of the gas or repairing or replacing items (that are not yours) that you broke (including decoys that you shot and sank).
  • Not helping during a hunt (including not helping get my boat back on the trailer).
  • Not controlling your dog during a hunt (a dog that wants to go play with the decoys or charge the ducks as they are coming in will ruin the hunt).
  • Not talking quietly, especially when ducks are coming to the decoys (ducks can hear you and will veer away).
  • Indicating that you will attend a hunt and then not showing up.
  • A pattern of being more than a few minutes late.
  • A pattern of canceling at the last minute.
  • Not returning my phone calls and/or emails.
  • Contacting Chris Campbell directly and attempting to arrange your own hunts, which is effectively bypassing others on the rotation.
  • Letting your friends know about Chris’ family pond and then they contact Chris or his grandfather and ask permission to hunt.

The following people are on the Self-guided Inland Duck Hunt Rotation for 9/1/20 – 8/31/21 (as stated in How the Rotations Work, the Event Hierarchy applies):

  1. Randy Rowley (I always will have Spot # 1 for hunts from my boat, as I am the boat captain)
  2. Chris Rowley (Chris and Ryan prefer to go on hunts together)
  3. Ryan Rowley (Ryan and Chris prefer to go on hunts together)
  4. Daryl Moczygemba
  5. Binh Chu
  6. Steve Fusco
  7. Edwin Zamora and his minor son
  8. Mike Pozhenko and his minor son
  9. Rob Peterson
  10. Ragan Brock
  11. Wayne Weilnau
  12. Raul Pena
  13. Jeff Cates
  14. Burl Fulenwider
  15. Mario Garza
  16. Ian Daniels
  17. Blake Brosig
  18. Jim McGee
  19. Chris Campbell
  20. Zack Elmer
  21. Kevin McConnell
  22. Don Hebert and his minor son
  23. Earl Prochnick
  24. Zack Tumlinson
  25. Clayton Carrier
  26. Jonathan Fleming
  27. Ken Miller
  28. Mark Kelton
  29. Jeremy Franks
  30. Colin Jackson
  31. Patrick Kelley
  32. Roy Zengerle

Let me know at randywrowley@gmail.com (my preference) or 512-922-2484 if you would like to be added to this rotation.  Individuals added after 9/17/20 will be added to the bottom of the list.  Let me know if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Mar
06

2021 Hunting Trips Reports

Posted by: | Comments Comments Off on 2021 Hunting Trips Reports

Read More→

Categories : Hunting Reports
Comments Comments Off on 2021 Hunting Trips Reports
Feb
22

2/22/21 State of the Club Report

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Read More→

Categories : Columns
Comments (0)
Feb
20

Waterfowl Hunt Rotation (Guided)

Posted by: | Comments (0)

The following is a rotation list for guided waterfowl hunts on Texas ponds, rivers, lakes, or bays.

We have had hunts for the past several seasons with Ricky Ethridge (Donie, Marquis, Cameron, and Lockhart), Rayce Jenkins (El Campo), Bret Jepsen (DFW), Jack Chamberland (McMahan), and Matt Strayer (Altair).  Our most successful hunts have been with Rayce, Bret, and Ricky.  Our most inexpensive hunts are with Ricky.

We have gotten our limits several times, done well several times, and not done well a few times.  Here are some of our successes:

Costs:

  • Guide fees run between $125 – $225.  We recommend a 15 – 20% tip, based on the effort.
  • We’ll split the vehicle gas (the amount depends on the distance traveled and the number of people sharing the gas).  If we take a toll road, because we’re running late, we’ll split that fee.
  • We’ll eat out or get drive-through food.
  • Depending on the distance we might stay in a motel.

What to Bring:

  • Hunting license, state migratory bird stamp, and federal duck stamp.  If you bought a super combo license it includes your hunting license and migratory bird endorsement but does not include a federal duck stamp.
  • Shotgun.  A 12 gauge piston operated semi-automatic with a 3-inch chamber is recommended.  A plug is required for semi-automatics and pumps capable of holding more than two shells in the magazine while hunting migratory game birds.
  • Camo or dull non-cloth shotgun case.  Cloth cases during waterfowl hunts tend to get muddy.  We’ll leave the cases in the bed of the guide’s truck.  If we’re hunting from a boat a floating case is recommended.
  • Non-lead shotgun shells (HEVI-Steel, Winchester Xpert, or equivalent in 2 shot – the 1550 FPS variant) chambered for 3-inch chambers (if your gun is also chambered for 3 inches) are recommended.   Randy Rowley does not recommend anything smaller than 4 shot.  10 gauges and 3 1/2 inch shells in 3 1/2 inch chambered 12 gauges are overkill for ducks, in his opinion.  Steel shot (if of adequate size) will kill ducks – there is no need for Hevi-shot, Tungsten, Bismuth, etc.  You’ll pay a lot more for those shells and they aren’t needed.  You’ll not need more than three boxes and will probably shoot less than two boxes.
  • Camo or dull blind bag, shell bag, vest, or bandoleer.  If your shell bag is bright (e.g., a red HEB shopping bag) you’ll need to hide it well.  If we’re hunting from a boat a floating blind bag is recommended.
  • Headlamp or cap light.
  • Camo outer hunting clothes, including cap/hat and a face mask or face paint (face coverings are absolutely essential as oily skin glows in a duck’s eyes).  If rain is predicted, bring rain gear.
  • Waders (absolutely essential except on the pond hunts).  Breathable waders are recommended for warmer hunts.  Neoprene waders are recommended for colder hunts (if you wear 5mm thick neoprene waders on a November or December hunt you might cook yourself).  We don’t put our waders on until we reach the pond, lake, or river (the exception is if you have breathable waders and it’s a cold morning).  If we’re hunting a pond bring boots that you don’t mind getting muddy, but waders will not be required.
  • Bucket, stool, or folding chair (if the guide does not have a bench in his blind; if hunting from the natural cover this is optional as you can sit on the ground, but you won’t be able to see the ducks as easily).
  • Drinks and snacks (optional; drinks are highly recommended).
  • Non-mirrored sunglasses (optional).
  • Bug repellent (optional) for hunts during the early part of the season.
  • A small ice chest or bag to take your ducks home in (if you get any).

Randy has extras of many of the items that are listed above and will happily loan things if you let him know that you would like to borrow something before we leave.  Of course, if you borrow something and break or lose it he will expect reimbursement.

Randy usually starts out with a modified choke.  If the ducks are coming into the dekes, he’ll switch to an improved cylinder.  Most modern screw-in chokes are designed for lead and non-lead shot without a change in the pattern density.

Depending on the guide and location, you could be hunting from a traditional blind, lay-out blind, pit blind, panel blind, or natural cover.

Traditional blind (outside)

Traditional blind (inside)

1/18/16 - El Campo Duck Hunt - Ken Miller in pit blind

Pit blind

Layout blinds

Panel blind

11/18/14 - Aransas Pass Duck Hunt - Burl & Randy

Natural cover

Most guides clean the birds for you.  If they do not offer this service, that will be stated in the information about the hunt.

Being on this rotation is a privilege and is not an FCS membership benefit.  This rotation is a service to FCS members and guests, but the event coordinators/leaders will not tolerate the below actions.  A person can be removed from the rotation for any of the following reasons (this list is not all-inclusive):

  • Not hunting in a safe manner, including deliberately not following the guide’s instructions and the FCS Safety and Shooting rules, Hunting and Fishing Rules, and Game Law Clarifications during a hunt.
  • Not paying for your share of the gas or fixing or replacing items (that are not yours) that you broke.
  • Not helping during a hunt when the guide asks you to.
  • Not controlling your dog during a hunt (a dog that wants to go play with the decoys or charge the ducks as they are coming in will ruin the hunt).
  • Not talking quietly, especially when ducks are coming to the decoys (ducks can hear you and will veer away).
  • Indicating that you will attend a hunt and then not showing up.
  • A pattern of being more than a few minutes late.
  • A pattern of canceling at the last minute.
  • Not returning the event coordinator’s/leader’s phone calls and/or emails.

The following people are on the Guided Inland Duck Hunt Rotation for 9/1/20 – 8/31/21 (as stated in How the Rotations Work, the Event Hierarchy applies):

  1. Don Hebert and his minor son
  2. Jonathan Fleming
  3. Clayton Carrier
  4. Chris Campbell
  5. Earl Prochnick
  6. Raul Pena
  7. Kevin McConnell
  8. Zack Tumlinson
  9. Mike Smith
  10. Burl Fulenwider
  11. Jeff Cates
  12. Jim McGee
  13. Wayne Weilnau
  14. Mark Kelton
  15. Mike Pozhenko and his minor son
  16. Ian Daniels
  17. Randy Rowley (Randy and Ryan Rowley prefer to go on hunts together)
  18. Ryan Rowley (Ryan and Randy Rowley prefer to go on hunts together)
  19. Ted Lieb (Ted, Blake, and Isaac Lieb prefer to go on hunts together)
  20. Blake Lieb (Blake, Ted, and Isaac Lieb prefer to go on hunts together)
  21. Isaac Lieb (Isaac, Ted, and Blake Lieb prefer to go on hunts together)
  22. Burl Fulenwider
  23. Patrick Kelley
  24. Roy Zengerle

Let Randy know at randywrowley@gmail.com (his preference) or 512-922-2484 if you would like to be added to this rotation.  Individuals added after 9/17/20 will be added to the bottom of the rotation.  Let Randy know if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Feb
08

6/3/21 FCS Meeting

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Our next FCS Meeting (social activity) will be on Thursday, 6/3/21, 7:00 – 9:30 PM at a location TBD.  If you would like to volunteer your house, please contact Randy Rowley at randywrowley@gmail.com (his preference) or 512-922-2484.

RSVP is required to Randy to ensure that we’ll have enough food at the above email address and/or phone number.  Also, let Randy know if you have any questions.

Schedule:

7:00 PM – fellowship and cook and eat dinner

8:00 PM – president’s report, upcoming events, training presentation/  devotional

9:30 PM – depart

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Jan
28

3/6/21 Guided Upland Bird Hunt

Posted by: | Comments (0)

FCS will hunt upland birds with Mike Schumann again on Saturday, 3/6/21, at the old Dismukes/Bieberstein Ranch near Dime Box.  They have 900 acres of blackland prairie covered with native grass and short brush, post oak savannah with improved pasture, lightly wooded uplands, and heavily wooded bottomlands – an ideal match for upland birds like quail, pheasants, and chukars.  We had several highly successful hunts with Mike Schumann (see the below picture and the many hunting reports).  On 2/23/19, eight FCS hunters killed a record 101 birds, including 63 quail, 22 chukars, and 16 pheasants.

Address: 1011 Cr 453, Dime Box TX 77853
GPS: 30.35372 -96.88686

This will be a full day hunt starting at 9:00 AM and ending around 3:00 PM (not counting travel time).  As with all ranches in Central Texas, these will be pen raised birds.   The price is $250 per person.  An additional package of birds costs $180.  A 20% tip ($50) is highly recommended.  The hunt includes:

  • Kids (15 years old & under) hunt FREE with paid adults
  • FREE shooting lessons
  • Sporting clays and bird processing included (lunch not included)
  • Hunting dogs will be provided (if you would like to bring your well-trained (for upland bird hunting) and well-mannered dog, you can, but only one or two dogs can come, and we must clear your dog with Mike and the other hunters)

We currently the following commitments:

  1. Rick Zuniga
  2. Burl Fulenwider
  3. Jim Miller + grandson
  4. Bret Mercer
  5. Mike Pozhenko
  6. Leo Pozhenko
  7. Flint Deshazo

The Event Hierarchy applies.  We can take eight hunters.  Seven spots have been filled, so we have one open.  An RSVP is required to Steve Fusco at steven.fusco@gmail.com or 512-584-6258.  Mike accepts cash, PayPal, and checks.

You can choose from the following packages:

  • 18 quail
  • 9 chukars
  • 6 pheasants
  • Mix 6 quail, 3 chukars, and 2 pheasants
  • Mix 9 quail and 4 chukars
  • Mix 4 chukars and 3 pheasants
  • Mix 9 quail and 3 pheasants
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 030318_Shumann-Bros-hunt_group-300x169.jpg
3/3/18 Upland Bird Hunt
Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Jan
27

Hall of Fame/Shame

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Hall of Fame

FCS had good experiences with the below businesses/outfitters/guides and will rehire/recommends them.  Included is the event(s) that we did with them, other activities that they offer, and their location.

  • 74 Ranch Resort (24-hour sporting clay shoots; they also offer hunting for several species of big game, dove, quail, and turkeys; near Campbellton)
  • Alpine Shooting Range (sporting clays shoot; they also have skeet and trap ranges and clay target throwers, rifle and handgun ranges; near Fort Worth)
  • Capital City Clays (sporting clays, 5-stand, and skeet shoots; and sporting clays tournaments they also have trap ranges; near Austin)
  • Todd Condiff (guided duck hunt; DFW area)
  • Copperhead Creek Shooting Club (sporting clays tournaments; they also have skeet, trap, rifle, and handgun ranges; near Marble Falls)
  • Eagle Peak Shooting Range (rifle and handgun ranges and clay target throwers; near Jonestown)
  • Elm Fork Shooting Sports (sporting clays shoot; they also have skeet, trap, rifle, handgun, and archery ranges, DFW area)
  • Limitless Outdoor Adventures/Jacob Orr (guided duck hunt; DFW area)
  • Ricky Ethridge (guided duck hunts and semi-guided hog hunts; he also offers guided teal hunts and semi-guided deer and axis deer hunts; near Marquez, Cameron, Lockhart, Rocksprings, and in Mexico)
  • Rayce Jenkins (guided duck, teal, goose, and sandhill crane hunts; near El Campo)
  • Mike Schumann (guided upland bird hunts; near Dimebox)
  • Tenney Creek Outfitters/Jack Chamberland (guided duck and semi-guided hog hunts; they also offer guided upland bird hunts; near McMahan)
  • Texas Wild (semi-guided hog hunts and dove hunts; they also offer season leases for duck and semi-guided turkey and deer hunts; near Pleasanton)
  • Three Curl Outfitters/Bret Jepsen (guided duck hunt; they also offer semi-guided hog and dove hunts, and guided quail hunts; DFW area)

Hall of Shame

FCS had bad experiences with the below outfitters/guides and will not rehire or recommend them.  These experiences including lack of game/false representations of the amount and type of game that is being seen, lack of scouting/effort, and/or misrepresentation of lodging and/or food.  Included is the event that we did with them and their location.

  • Blue Roan Bend Outfitters (goose and duck hunt – lack of game; near Eagle Lake)
  • Brett Manry (hog hunt – lack of game – sent several pictures of hogs, our six hunters only saw one hog and it was on a neighbor’s property; near Cherokee)
  • Dove Heaven/Double H Outfitters/Justin (dove hunt – not enough game for the number of hunters they had and they put 30 hunters 100 yards from us that shot most of the dove that were heading our way; near San Antonio)
  • Elm Creek Outfitters (an affiliate of theirs) (dove hunt – lack of game; near Hutto)
  • Haun Ranch (deer and hog hunt) – did not tell us until after we arrived that does were by permit only and only two of  our hunters could take one; near Victoria)
  • Heart of Texas Guided Hunt/Texas Thermal Hog Hunts (hog hunt – lack of game, poor quality/worn out thermal sights, and deceptive trade practices on lodging and food; near Hubbard)
  • Pinoak Ranch (duck hunt – lack of game; near Tehuacana)
  • Simmons Waterfowl Service (duck hunt – lack of game and his idea of concealment is laughable (sitting on straw bales in the open); near Fort Worth)
  • Triple Play Outfitters (dove hunt – lack of game; near New Braunfels)

Members – if you have an outfitter from an FCS trip that you’d like Randy Rowley to consider adding to either of these lists, send an email to him at randywrowley@gmail.com.  It would be helpful if you would also submit details of the encounter.

Categories : Halls of Fame/Shame
Comments (0)
Jan
06

1/30/21 Self-guided Inland Duck Hunt

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Our next Self-guided Inland Duck Hunt will be on Saturday morning, 1/30/21 on a lake TBD.

Randy Rowley will be able to take three hunters with him.  He plans to hunt from his boat.

When we’ll leave will be determined by what lake we go to.  If Granger, it will be at 3:15 AM.  If Stillhouse Hollow, it will be at 2:45 AM.  If Waco, it will be at 2:00 AM.  We’ll stop at Whataburger’s drive-thru on the way there and possibly somewhere on the way home.  We’ll share truck and boat gas and a toll road fee.  There may be a boat ramp or park entrance fee.

The Rotation and the Event Hierarchy will apply.  RSVP to Randy and/or let him know if you have any questions that the Rotation page doesn’t answer at randywrowley@gmail.com (his preference) or 512-922-2484.

Also, as the Rotation page states, he has extras of many of the items that you’ll need for this hunt (such as waders, floating gun cases, cap lights, etc.) and will happily loan things if a request to borrow something occurs before we leave.  Of course, if someone borrows something and breaks or loses it he will expect reimbursement.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Dec
20

2020 Hunting Trips Reports

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Read More→

Categories : Hunting Reports
Comments (0)
Nov
19

1/16/21 Guided Duck Hunt

Posted by: | Comments (0)

FCS will go on a Guided Inland Duck Hunt on Saturday, 1/16/21 with Rayce Jenkins on a pond near El Campo.  Note that this is primarily a make-up hunt for the hunters who went on the 1/12/20 Guided Sandhill Crane Hunt with Rayce that resulted in a poor harvest.  The cost for them is $112.50/hunter.  The cost for anyone who did not go last year is $225/hunter.  Prices do not include a highly recommended 20% tip.  We have had several highly successful hunts with Rayce, including this one:

1/18/16 – 18 teal and five shovelers

El Campo is 144 miles from Randy Rowley’s house, so going down the night before and staying in a motel may be the wisest course of action.  Wharton (13 miles away) has the cheapest motels.  Expedia has several deals, including Travelers Inn & Suites for $71 for two beds, including taxes.

Or you can ride with Burl Fulenwider and Randy Rowley on Saturday at 2:00 AM.  If you ride with Burl and Randy, they’ll stop at Whataburger for an early breakfast and eat again after the hunt.  They’ll share gas.

Rayce can handle up to five hunters and one spot has become available.

Contact Randy at randywrowley@gmail.com (his preference) or 512-922-2484 if you want the spot or have any questions that the Duck Hunt (Inland) Rotation (Guided) web page doesn’t answer.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Nov
16

12/19/20 Guided Inland Duck Hunt

Posted by: | Comments (0)

FCS will have a Guided Inland Duck Hunt with Blue Roan Outfitters near Elm Bend on Saturday, 12/19/20.  The cost is $225/hunter, not including a highly recommended tip.  They have a 280-acre lake.  From their pictures, they get a lot more variety of ducks than Rayce Jenkins typically gets.

They are 132 miles from Randy Rowley’s house, so going down the night before and staying in a motel or their lodge may be the wisest course of action.  Sealy (19 miles away) and Wharton (26 miles away) have cheap motels.  Their lodge is expensive ($750/night for the group).  Expedia has several deals.

They can handle up to five hunters.

An RSVP is required to Ian Daniels at idaniels@austin.rr.com or 512-633-2221.  The Guided Inland Duck Hunt Rotation and the Event Hierarchy will apply.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

An FCS Self-guided/chartered Coastal Blast and Cast to Port O’Connor is set for 1/22/21 – 1/24/21.  Redheads dominate the area, but we’ve also bagged wigeons and pintails.  Here is a video from a past trip to Corpus Christi – https://www.facebook.com/Randy.Rowley/videos/10152917784232394 (if you don’t have Facebook you won’t be able to view it).  Daryl Shipper and his crew did very well at the jetties during the last week of December 2019, catching several bull redfish.

The plan presently is to hunt in the mornings and fish in the afternoons but that could change based on results.  It’s also possible for a boat to be dedicated to hunting only and another boat to be dedicated to fishing only.  If fishing is bad, we might forget about it and focus on hunting and vice versa.  We’ll play it by ear.

We have two bay boats committed to this trip (Daryl Shipper’s and Randy Rowley’s).  We’ll stay at The Inn at Clark’s.  It has four queen-sized beds.  We’ll eat out.  Everyone will buy his own bait and/or use artificial lures.  We’ll share truck and boat gas, with the exception of the boat captains.

The Event Hierarchy applies.  This trip is full.  Let Randy know at randywrowley@gmail.com (his preference) or 512-922-2484 if you would like to be added to the Blast and Cast Rotation and the waiting list in case someone drops out or if you have any questions that the Blast and Cast Rotation page does not answer.  Also, he has extras of many of the items that you’ll need for this hunt (such as waders, floating gun cases, cap lights, etc.) and will happily loan things if you let him know that you would like to borrow something before we leave.  Of course, if you borrow something and break or lose it he will expect reimbursement.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

The first FCS Self-guided/chartered Coastal Blast and Cast of the season is set for 12/11/20 – 12/13/20 at Corpus Christi.  Redheads dominate the area, but we’ve also bagged wigeons, pintails, scaups, buffleheads, mergansers, and even a GWT.  Here is a video from a past trip – https://www.facebook.com/Randy.Rowley/videos/10152917784232394 (note: if you don’t have Facebook, you won’t be able to view it).

Duck hunters will launch at Wilson’s Cut.  Fishermen will either launch at the Packery Channel, Port A, or the Marker 37 Marina (depending on weather, tides, and fishing reports).  The plan presently is to fish in the mornings and hunt in the afternoons, but that could change based on results.  It’s also possible for a boat to be dedicated to hunting only and another boat to be dedicated to fishing only.  If fishing is bad, we might forget about it and focus on hunting and vice versa.  We’ll play it by ear.

We have two bay boats committed to this trip (Daryl Shipper’s and Randy Rowley’s).  We’ll stay at this Airbnb house – https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/25839181?adults=8&check_in=2020-12-11&check_out=2020-12-13&source_impression_id=p3_1601677942_BnKY5BLXmd%2FjmAk5.  It has a king, three queens, and a single.  Parking our rigs there will be a breeze, and they will be safer there at night.  It’s swanky.  The cost would be $53/night/person (figuring eight people).  We’ll eat out.  Everyone will buy his own bait, and/or you can use artificial lures.  We’ll share truck and boat gas.

This trip is limited to eight people, including Daryl and Randy, and is full.  The Blast and Cast Rotation applies, as does the Event Hierarchy.  If you’re new to the rotations, here is How the Rotations Work.

Let Randy know if you would like to be added to the Rotation, added to the waiting list (if you’re on the Rotation), or if you have any questions that the Blast and Cast Rotation page does not answer at randywrowley@gmail.com (his preference) or 512-922-2484.  Also, he has extras of many of the items you’ll need for this hunt (such as waders, floating gun cases, cap lights, etc.) and will happily loan things if you let him know that you would like to borrow something before we leave.  Of course, if you borrow something and break or lose it, he will expect reimbursement.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Sep
22

Classified Ads

Posted by: | Comments (0)

This web page is solely a service provided by the Fellowship of Christian Sportsmen (FCS).  This service does not constitute or imply FCS’ association, endorsement, or recommendation of any of the following listings.

All classified ads have a three-month retention date from the original date of posting.  All ads three months old and older will be deleted unless Bruce Crockett is contacted by the ad lister requesting a date extension.  Bruce will set a new date stamp for the relisted ad, which will extend the listing for three additional months.  The ad can be relisted as many times as the lister desires, as long as the lister contacts Bruce before the listing expires.  Contact Bruce at bmc55@att.net if you wish to extend or add a classified ad.

This policy reduces limited storage space and removes ads where the item(s) have already been sold, donated, given away, or retained.

Categories : Classified Ads
Comments (0)

I have been having problems with two of my game cameras not taking pictures.  At first, I thought that it was the SD cards so I bought two new ones and the cameras still were not working.  I replaced the batteries and still didn’t have results for one of the cameras, so I figured that it was toast (it’s about four years old).  So, I bought another one. Read More→

Categories : Articles
Comments (0)

FCS will hunt hogs on Brett Manry’s ranch near Crockett (170 miles from NW Austin).  The cost is $200/a hunter for the weekend, includes lodging in a bunkhouse and includes unlimited hogs and coyotes.

The ranch has 480 acres, three ponds, two wet creeks, multiple stands, lights on feeders, a 400-yard shooting range, a cleaning station, and a charcoal/wood smoker/grill and a fire pit to cook on (his looks very capable, but Randy Rowley has the FCS grill that the hunters can take with them).

This is stand hunting only – Brett does not allow stalks.

The hunt is limited to six hunters and is full.  Contact Randy at randywrowley@gmail.com (his preference) or 512-922-2484 to be added to his ‘will-call’ list, in case someone drops out.  Let Randy know if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Sep
12

Arrows and More for Sale

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Listed 10/7/20

John Bobo has 13 good 30-inch carbon arrows (practice tips included) for sale at $3.50 each, plus other odds and ins. Read More→

Categories : Classified Ads
Comments (0)
Sep
10

Bore Snake by Dennis Koch

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Dennis Koch bought a Bore Snake at a gun show for his Ruger 10/22. The .22 Bore Snake sells for around $15.00 – $17.00. The first time that he used his Bore Snake it made his Ruger’s barrel look brand new. They are also available at Academy, Wal-Mart, and Cabela’s. Product information includes:

  • Simply a better way to clean handguns, rifles, and shotguns.
  • Brushes and swabs the bore in one quick pass.
  • Has built-in bore brushes.
  • No assembly required.
  • Lightweight and compact.
  • Solvent compatible.
  • Washable and reusable. No exposed metal to damage sensitive rifling or crown.
Categories : Products
Comments (0)
Sep
10

BOSS Shotgun Shells

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Raul Pena highly recommends TSS Ammunition and their BOSS Shotgun Shells.  They have superior penetration, stopping power, and range.  For more information see:

https://pipesf16.wordpress.com/range-comparison-steel-itx-hw13-tss/

https://waterfowlchoke.com/tss-ammunition-is-a-game-changer/

Categories : Products
Comments (0)
Sep
10

European and Skull Mounts

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Listed 12/23/20

Randy Rowley offers European and skull mounting. Read More→

Categories : Classified Ads
Comments (0)
Sep
09

Gun Cleaning

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Listed 12/23/20

Randy Rowley offers gun cleaning and very limited gunsmithing, such as adding a fiber-optic sight to a shotgun. Read More→

Categories : Classified Ads
Comments (0)
Sep
05

Inflatable Life Vest for Sale

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Listed 12/28/20

Tim Price has an inflatable life vest for sale (they inflate when they are submerged in water).  It is new with tags.  He is asking $60.  These are a lot more comfortable to wear than traditional life vests during a day of fishing.  Contact Tim at 512-970-9862.

Categories : Classified Ads
Comments (0)

Listed 12/28/20

Tim Price has a vehicle rooftop hard-shell cargo carrier for sale.  He is asking $100.  Contact Tim at 512-970-9862.

Categories : Classified Ads
Comments (0)
Aug
31

9/3/20 Dove Hunt

Posted by: | Comments (0)

FCS will hunt dove on Thursday, 9/3/20, from 5:00 PM until sunset on a ranch near Holland.  The ranch is 230 acres and has a big tank on it and sunflowers and is holding a lot of birds.  Mike Walsh toured the ranch on 8/30/20.  The cost is $30.00.

We can bring 15 hunters and this hunt is full.  Contact Mike at duxmn@austin.rr.com or 512-560-7001 to be added to his ‘will-call list’ in case someone drops out.  Contact Mike if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

FCS will hunt dove on Saturday, 9/18/21 – Sunday, 9/19/21 with Texas Wild near Pearsall.

We’ve had two successful dove hunts with them – once in the fall and once in the winter (this was pre-website so Randy Rowley doesn’t have the reports on how we did, nor can he recall where we hunted, but he thinks that it was close to San Antonio).

We can take 15 hunters and possibly more.  The cost is $100/day.  Mike Walsh booked eight double-occupancy rooms (two king-sized beds) at the Pearsall La Quinta.  The cost per hunter is $62/night.  If a person stays in a room by himself/herself it is $124/night.

RSVP is required to Mike at duxmn@austin.rr.com or 512-560-7001.  Contact Mike if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

Read More→

Categories : Columns
Comments (0)
Aug
17

9/26/20 Guided Teal Hunt

Posted by: | Comments (0)

FCS will hunt teal with guide Rayce Jenkins near El Campo on Saturday, 9/26/20.  We have had successful teal hunts with Rayce in the past.  We are verifying the time.

The price is $200.  That includes bird cleaning.  We highly recommend a 15 – 20% tip, based on effort.

El Campo is 130 miles from downtown Austin, so give consideration to staying in a motel the night before.  If not, you’ll have to probably leave around 2:00 AM to get there on time.

Rayce can handle five hunters and we’re full.  Contact Ian Daniels at idaniels@austin.rr.com or 512-633-2221 to be added to his ‘will-call’ list in case someone drops out.  Also, contact Ian if you have any questions.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Jun
14

7/11/20 FCS Sporting Clays Shoot

Posted by: | Comments (0)

Our next FCS Sporting Clays Shoot on Saturday, 7/11/20, from 9:00 – 11:30 AM at Capital City Clays.  We’ll shoot one round of 50 sporting clays.  We’ll probably shoot their red course (formerly called the corporate/hunter course).

Note that the following restrictions are still in place by Capital City Clays – Randy Rowley’s commentary is in red):

  • Groups cannot exceed four people.  (Consequently, this shoot might take longer.)
  • Proper distancing is required.  Do not “pile-up” at a station.  If the group in front of you is not done shooting, please wait several yards away until they move on.
  • The clubhouse and bathrooms are locked.
  • They cannot put out bottled water.

Face masks are not required.  Hopefully, things will be back to normal for our August shoot.

You can shoot singles, report pairs, or true pairs… or you can follow the menu at each station which is a mix of true pairs and report pairs.  We keep score just for fun and keep a history log on the FCS website (now under Events) so you can see how you have improved over time.

  • 9:00 AM – Sporting clays
  • 11:00 AM – Scores and announcements
  • 11:30 AM – Depart

Who should come: Members and guests, including ladies and youth, both new shooters and experienced.  We usually have around 10 participants, and we break up into groups.  We recommend all shooters be at least 10 years old.  For youths, we suggest a 20 gauge that fits the child (if a youth shoots a .410 he or she will probably miss a lot and may get discouraged).  We often have new shooters and delight in teaching others what we have learned.

Cost and what to bring: Each 50 round course costs $23.81/person (includes tax).  If you don’t have a shotgun you can use one of ours.  Most of us shoot a 12 gauge, but a 20 gauge is good also. Capital City Clays requires eye and ear protection (available free of charge at Capital City Clays).  They sell shotgun shells if you need them (but you can get them cheaper at Academy, Walmart, etc.).  You’ll need to bring two boxes of shells per round of sporting clays.  Randy recommends Winchester Game Loads /Federal Game and Target Loads / Estate Dove Loads / Rio Game Loads / Remington Sure Shot Heavy Dove Loads / Estate Dove and Target Loads. All of which are sometimes available at Academy.  1 oz or 1-1/8 oz loads and 1250-1300 FPS and 7-1/2 or 8 shot work well.  They all sell for $5.50 – $7.00/box.  All six are great dove/quail loads in addition to being good clay target loads.  If you’re a dove/quail hunter, Randy recommends that for you shoot sporting clays with the same load that you use to hunt dove/quail.  This enables you to develop consistent leads for similarly sized targets.  Most of the targets on their Red course are close enough for skeet chokes, but IC works fine.

Location: 8707 Lindell Lane (near the Travis County Exposition Center and Lake Decker)

Capital City Clay’s phone number: 512-272-4707

In the event of rain: Light rain – we shoot; heavy rain – we stay home and Mike Walsh, Bruce Crockett, or Randy Rowley will send out a cancellation notice

Questions:  Contact Mike Walsh at duxmn@austin.rr.com or 512-560-7001.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)
Apr
03

Testimonials

Posted by: | Comments (0)
Wanted to thank both of you for putting on the Upland bird hunt this past weekend.  We had a blast, no pun intended.  Steven did a great job and the gentleman and his two sons who did the hunt were great.  They could not have been more welcoming and fun.  Everyone followed the instructions like we are supposed to and everyone got to shoot and hit a bird or two or more.  When the birds were released the guns were blazing.  Can’t thank you two enough.  It was a lot of fun and hope the next hunt is just as good.
Frank H.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Very grateful to have spent time with FCS where people are always safety conscious.

Scott T.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

I’m already missing you guys!  Great folks at FCS.  I really appreciate the opportunity to spend time with you!

Scott T.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Randy,

I enjoy the  club and all the great members.

Earl P.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

FCS Webmaster:

Thanks for all your work in putting together FCS’s current, past & on-going clays score cards. Your spread sheet is easy to get around & 1st class as is the rest of our FCS website.

Thanks again,

Harold T.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Randy,

Really nice work on the FCS website page.

James W.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Randy,

Harrison and I went hunting yesterday am at friends place north of Walburg. Excellent morning and I limited and Harrison got 11 – our shooting much better and lots of dove until about 8:30. Great fun – I even hit 2 birds with one shot!

I got invitation to go back out in afternoon and seriously considered it – I already had the birds in the freezer. But then I thought about one of your talks about this very thing and what influence I might have on Harrison and compromise my values – so, I didn’t go.

Just wanted you to know we do hear some of what you say!

Flint D.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Randy,

You should take part in a contest for one of the best blogs on the web. I will recommend this site!

Ryan

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Randy,

I was at GHBC for a Tres Dias meeting 2 or 3 years ago when I signed up on your email list. I have enjoyed following you guys and if I ever move to your area count me in. I live in Ft. Worth now. God bless your ministry!

Luke

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Hi Randy,

Glad to know who did the cooking. Just want to say how much I enjoyed it. You guys did a great job. Glad to hear that you’ll be cooking next time, too.

Jo Ann O.

President’s note: this is in reference to the 3/31/11 Wild Game Dinner.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Hi Randy!

Thanks again for keeping me on the FCS email list. I really do enjoy it and appreciate your dedication and hard work.

Keep up the good work!

Rod W.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Thank you Randy for all your hard work with this ministry, FCS needs to have a booth at Global Impact Celebration next year.

Larry D.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Dear Randy,

You have no idea what the corn & meat & butter means to residents of St. George’s.  Recently the food bank has been cut out.  In the past once a month the Social Worker would go to the Food Pantry & bring food in.

Last month it was hot dogs & buns.

I have been bringing bread home from Mission Possible.

You have no idea of the excitement.  Two ladies regrouped the corn so all could receive.

Bless you!

Patsy M.

President’s note: we donated the left-overs from the 3/31/11 Wild Game Dinner to the residents of St. George’s Court, a low-income housing project for elderly and the handicapped.  One of the residents wrote the following note.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Sirs,

Becky and I had a great time shooting with you all!

Thank you, Randy for setting it up for us to participate in this event!

WHAT A DEAL – all the instruction and clays we could ask for!

The instructors were great. I heard basically the same advice form different instructors in sometimes different ways – which to us reinforced the instruction.

Becky and I got good results.

That was a great end to a near perfect day. Perfect as a close miss followed by breaking many more in a row!

That you all for including us in this event, being fellow sports people, trying to follow His trail.

Harold T.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Hey Randy,

I had a great time last night! What fun! What a great group of guys that showed up.. I think i may have made some new buddies.. I appreciate you running the club and leading from the front to see things happen and get done! Thank you for your dedication to the kingdom and have a great weekend!

Phil N.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Hey Randy,

I had a great time getting to know everyone that made it out to Cutchen’s place! I appreciate you helping me feel welcome with the group and look forward to the shooting range… Also thanks for the shot gun cleaning kit… Have a great week and look forward to being apart of the club more and we’ll see you sooner than later!

Phil N.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Had a great time last nite and some good eats. Appreciate the word given.

Mark M.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Randy,

Thanks for a wonderful and fun day. It was good to be out there and meet some of the members, not to mention great shooting among us. I can’t wait till the next round to do this again.

Robby W.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

I had a good time visiting too!

Good Bible study, sent the link to some friends.

Thomas P.

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Hi Randy – I have been meaning to send you a message since Thursday, and I suppose I forgot. I just wanted to say thank you for having me out, I really enjoyed the group. I look forward to getting to know you all better, and I am really looking forward to meeting up with you all at the shooting range as soon as possible. I know I will have a little bit of a struggle on some Saturdays getting someone to watch the kids, but it is definitely possible. At any rate, thanks again, and we will see you soon!

Paul I.

Categories : Calendar
Comments (0)
Mar
28

Rules of Conduct

Posted by: | Comments (0)

FCS Bylaws Regarding Conduct

Christian walk

A. Members agree to:

  1. To bear other members burdens.
  2. To pray for needs within our membership body.
  3. To never hunt or fish on special occasions (anniversary, wife’s birthday, Valentine’s Day, etc.).
  4. To refrain from consuming alcohol while shooting, hunting, fishing, or operating machinery, taking illegal drugs, and using profanity while on FCS events.
  5. Couples who are not married must sleep in separate quarters on overnight events.
  6. To obey all laws of the United States of America while on FCS events (this includes while traveling to and from events).

Driving Safety, Boating Life Jacket, Shooting, Hunting, Fishing, and Camping Rules  

These rules will be enforced at FCS events.  Violators can lose shooting, hunting, fishing, and camping privileges.  Repeat violators can be banned from FCS events and/or lose FCS membership, per our established procedures.

Driving Safety Rules

Members agree to:

  1. Drive vehicles and four wheelers and operate boats in a safe manner.

Boating Life Jacket Rules

  1. Life jackets must be worn while underway and until the boat has been exited and no longer on a dock, pier, or bulkhead, except the person who exits a boat at a dock once he or she has walked past the boat ramp.
  2. Life jackets must be worn while fishing in high traffic, high current, or dangerous areas such as the POC jetties.
  3. Life jackets must be worn while wearing winter clothing or waders.  When wading, the life jacket can be removed when entering the water.

Shooting Rules

Members agree to:

  1. Always treat all guns with the respect due a loaded gun.  Before handling a firearm, visually check the chamber, receiver, and magazine to make sure there is no ammunition anywhere in the firearm.
  2. Always wear eye and ear protection.
  3. Always learn how their gun operates.  Ask for instruction before going hunting.
  4. Always have their gun ready at the time of the hunt.  Do not arrive at a hog hunt, for example, and ask everyone to wait a couple hours for you to go sight in your rifle.
  5. Always load when the guide/leader says to load and unload when the guide/leader says to unload.
  6. Always check their gun and ammunition before loading.
  7. Always make sure their barrel and action are clear of obstructions and carry only ammunition of the proper caliber for their gun.
  8. Always put their safety on before loading and watch their muzzle at all times, including while loading.  Keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction at all times.  Never let the muzzle cover anything that is not intended to be destroyed.  Never rely on their gun’s safety.
  9. Always be sure of their target and what is in front of it and beyond it.  Know the identifying features of the game being hunted.  Ensure there is an adequate backstop—don’t shoot a rifle or handgun at a flat, hard surface (e.g. a rock or tree) or water.  The bullet may ricochet and travel in unpredictable directions.
  10. Always keep their finger outside the trigger guard until your sights are on the target.  This is the best way to prevent an accidental discharge.
  11. Always keep the safeties of their guns on except when they are actively shooting at game (dove, hogs, etc.) or clay, paper, etc. targets.
  12. Always point their gun only at something they intend to shoot.
  13. Always put their safeties back on immediately after firing.
  14. Always handle their gun with care, if it fails to fire when the trigger is pulled.  If a chambered round of ammunition does not fire when the trigger is pulled, put the gun on safety and keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.  Treat the gun as if it could still discharge.  Wait at least 30 seconds before slowly and carefully opening the action and unload the cartridge from the chamber.
  15. Always unload their gun before climbing a fence or tree, jumping a ditch, or running and pull guns toward them by the butt, not the muzzle.
  16. Always unload their gun when not in use.  Leave actions open, and carry firearms in cases and unloaded to and from the shooting area.
  17. Always store their guns and ammunition separately and safely.
  18. Always clean their guns when needed and have them repaired, if needed.

Hunting Rules

Members agree to:

  1. Acquire marksmanship skills that will assure clean kills.
  2. Always respect the property of the landowner (e.g., closing gates that they open).
  3. Always learn the rules of the host, landowner, guide, or leader and follow them (e.g., staying put until the agreed upon time).
  4. Always carry their fair share of the load. (e.g., paying a fair share of gas money and other expenses and doing a fair share of chores).
  5. Always hunt with any guests and minors that they bring.
  6. Always let the hunters around them know their position, especially when walking up on hunters who have their backs to them.
  7. Always bring only trained dogs on hunts and control them in the field.
  8. Always pick up their trash in the field (this includes empty shotgun shells).
  9. Always take dove, duck, etc. waste away with them, if required by the host, landowner, guide, or leader.
  10. Always obey all hunting regulations (examples of frequently violated regulations include: buying your child a hunting license for the purpose of taking more game for yourself and saying that your child bagged them, taking game over the limit and giving the excess to others, taking game over the limit and eating the excess, and shooting across county roads).
  11. Never shoot at unidentified furry or flying objects (UFO’s).
  12. Never kill or shoot at birds or animals that they do not intend to eat or are not doing so to assist in wildlife depredation (e.g., shooting at sparrows and dragonflies).
  13. Never shoot game that the landowner, host, outfitter, guide, or leader has disallowed from being hunted (check the hunt details or ask the landowner, host, outfitter, guide, or leader if unsure).
  14. Never take an unsafe shot (e.g., taking low shotgun shots when other hunters are within the ranges of their guns and are within their line of fire, etc.).
  15. Never take a shot that could potentially destroy someone else’s property (e.g., shooting dove off power lines).
  16. Never shoot at game outside of the effective ranges of their guns or their abilities.

Fishing Rules

Members agree to:

  1. Always learn how their reel operates.  Ask for instruction before going fishing.
  2. Always have their reel ready at the time of the fishing trip.  The start of a fishing trip is not the time to fill your reel with line.
  3. Always watch where your hooks are at all times, including every backcast (where your lure/hook is when you bring it back to cast), every single cast.
  4. Always ensure that line is not wrapped around your rod before you cast, every single cast.  If line is wrapped around your rod tip it can cause the lure to “rebound” and come back towards you or others.
  5. Always obey all fishing regulations (examples of frequently violated regulations include: buying your child a fishing license for the purpose of taking more fish for yourself and saying that your child caught them, taking fish over the limit and giving the excess to others, and taking fish over the limit and eating the excess).
  6. Never kill fish that you they not intend to eat or are not doing so to assist in wildlife depredation (e.g., throwing carp on the bank to suffocate).

Camping Rules

Members agree to:

  1. Always camp in the designated area only (if camping is allowed).
  2. Always pick up their trash and any other trash that they see in the campground.
  3. Always control their dogs at camp.
Categories : Rules of Conduct
Comments (0)
Mar
12

Sign Up for Email Alerts

Posted by: | Comments (0)

FCS has an FCS Google Group (e-mail distribution list) for future members. Whenever we receive urgent prayer requests or we need to change an imminent event, we let everyone in the Google Group know ASAP.

For less important changes, we usually send out a weekly “FCS News” email (this is a quick way to find out what is going on with FCS). Frequently updated pages include our Upcoming Events, Past Events, Photos, and Classified Ads.

There is no charge for this service and you can unsubscribe at any time. If you would like to be added to the future members Google Group please email Randy Rowley at randywrowley@gmail.com.

Categories : Email Alerts
Comments (0)

See https://fishgame.com/2016/05/basics-trout-fishing/.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

FCS will host our next monthly Sporting Clays shoot on Saturday, 4/11/20, from 9:00 – 11:15 AM at Capital City Clays.  We’ll shoot one round of 50 sporting clays.  We’ll probably shoot their red course (formerly called the corporate/hunter course).

You can shoot singles, report pairs or true pairs… or you can follow the menu at each station which is a mix of true pairs and report pairs.  We keep score just for fun and keep a history log on the web site so you can see how you have improved over time.

  • 9:05 AM – Sporting clays
  • 10:45 AM – Scores and announcements
  • 11:15 AM – Depart

Who should come: Members and guests, including ladies and youth, both new shooters and experienced.  We usually have around 10 participants, and we break up into groups of 4 – 5.  Note that the larger the group, the longer it will take to shoot.  We recommend all shooters be at least 10 years old.  For youths, we suggest a 20 gauge that fits the child (if a youth shoots a .410 he or she will probably miss a lot and may get discouraged).  We often have new shooters and delight in teaching others what we have learned.

Cost and what to bring: Each 50 round course costs $23.81/person (includes tax).  If you don’t have a shotgun you can use one of ours.  Most of us shoot 12 gauge, but 20 gauge is good also. Capital City Clays requires eye and ear protection (available free of charge at Capital City Clays).  They sell shotgun shells if you need them (but you can get them cheaper at Academy, Walmart, etc.).  You’ll need to bring two boxes of shells per round of sporting clays.  Randy Rowley recommends Winchester Game Loads /Federal Game and Target Loads / Estate Dove Loads / Rio Game Loads / Remington Sure Shot Heavy Dove Loads / Estate Dove and Target Loads. All of which are sometimes available at Academy.  1 oz or 1-1/8 oz loads and 1250-1300 FPS and 7-1/2 or 8 shot work well. They all sell for $5.50 – $7.00/box.  All six are great dove/quail loads in addition to being good clay target loads. If you’re a dove/quail hunter, Randy recommends that for you shoot sporting clays with the same load that you use to hunt dove/quail.  This enables you to develop consistent leads for similarly sized targets.  Most of the targets on their Red course are close enough for skeet chokes, but IC works just fine.

Location: 8707 Lindell Lane (near the Travis County Exposition Center and Lake Decker)

Capital City Clay’s phone number: 512-272-4707

In the event of rainLight rain – we shoot; heavy rain – we stay home and Mike Walsh or Randy will send out a cancellation notice

Questions:  Contact Mike Walsh at duxmn@austin.rr.com or 512-560-7001.

Categories : Uncategorized
Comments (0)

Randy Rowley highly recommends that you pay deposits via PayPal.  He’s made over 200 eBay transactions using PayPal and easily that many from other vendors without any problems.  Just within the last two weeks, He’s bought a bulk pack of AA batteries, an oil filter tool, two cordless work lights, a camo raincoat, three of his medicines, and a photo calendar for a Christmas gift online using PayPal.  This is not true of checks, which can become lost in the mail or stolen out of someone’s mailbox, which is what happened to some of our 2017 guided upland bird hunt deposit checks (they were stolen from Mike Schumann’s mailbox).  PayPal is one of three options for people to join FCS, renew their membership, or donate on our website.

It’s very easy to open a PayPal account.  Just go to www.paypal.com.  Click “Sign Up” on the top right.  Click “Personal Account” (unless you want to make it a business account).  Fill in the information requested (legal first name, last name, email address, and create a password and confirm it).  Then add the bank account or credit card that you want PayPal to debit purchases from and you’re done.

When paying with PayPal you can choose the “PayPal Credit” option which allows you to pay out purchases over six months at 0% interest (and charges you like a credit card if you don’t pay it out over six months).  Randy uses this option a lot for bigger purchases like my duck mounts.

If you decide to pay a guide/outfitter via PayPal do the following:

  1. Go to paypal.com
  2. Click “Send” on the top
  3. Click “Send money”
  4. In the “Name, email or mobile number” box type in their email address or phone number.
  5. Enter the amount that you wish to send. For example, if the deposit is $100.00 be sure to type in four zeros.  If you just type in “100” it will translate that as “1.00.”
  6. Select “Sending to a Friend” (by so doing the guide/outfitter doesn’t have to pay the 2.5% plus .30 PayPal fee)
  7. In the “Add a note” box put “For the 2/29/XX FCS hunt” (for example).  Click “Continue.”
  8. Select if you want the payment to come from the checking/savings/credit card account that you linked to PayPal or from PayPal Credit.  Click “Next.”
  9. Review the payment.  If correct, click “Send Payment Now.”  If incorrect go back and make whatever correction that needs to be made.
  10. Click “Log Out” at the top right

You can get a PayPal app for your smartphone that’s even faster than using their website.  Randy guarantees you that once you’ve paid via PayPal a couple of times it will be a lot faster than writing out a check, stuffing it in an envelope, addressing the envelope, putting a stamp on it, and mailing it.  Plus, you’ll save a lot of money by not having to buy stamps.  Randy hasn’t mailed anyone a check in a long time.

If Randy still haven’t convinced some of you dinosaurs, you can mail your deposits or payments in full to him at 11612 Birchbark Trail, Austin, TX, 78750.  Make your check out to him.  He’ll deposit it and pay the guide/outfitter via PayPal.  If you make it out to the guide/outfitter, he’ll just mail it to him and you’ll have to take your chances that he’ll get it.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

People who are 18 years of age or older are considered to be adults for purposes of figuring out a person’s share of lodging, gas, etc.  For dividing up food costs minors will be treated on their size or how much they eat.  For example, if a 12-year-old boy eats as much as a full-grown man he will be charged as a man, and not as a child, as the event coordinator or leader will have to buy a full-sized steak for him (if we’re camping) and not a half-sized one.

Categories : Facebook
Comments (0)

Bible verse of the day

The righteous person may have many troubles, but the Lord delivers him from them all.

Today’s Devotionals and Blogs

Kent Crockett’s blog – www.kentcrockett.blogspot.com

Mark Dillow’s blog – http://noclearline.blogspot.com/